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Latest Clovis culture Stories

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2011-02-25 06:15:00

The oldest human remains ever discovered in sub-Arctic North America have been unearthed in a newly excavated archaeological site in Alaska, scientists said on Thursday. The skeletal remains appear to be those of a 3-year-old child buried some 11,500 years ago, and could provide rare insight into the burial practices of Ice Age peoples and the lives of early settlers who crossed from Asia to the New World, the scientists said. The remains were discovered in an ancient fire pit within an...

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2010-09-30 07:57:57

New research challenges the controversial theory that an ancient comet impact devastated the Clovis people, one of the earliest known cultures to inhabit North America. Writing in the October issue of Current Anthropology, archaeologists Vance Holliday (University of Arizona) and David Meltzer (Southern Methodist University) argue that there is nothing in the archaeological record to suggest an abrupt collapse of Clovis populations. "Whether or not the proposed extraterrestrial impact...

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2010-08-30 20:20:40

Shock-synthesized diamonds said to prove a catastrophic impact killed off North American megafauna can't be foundAbout 12,900 years ago, a sudden cold snap interrupted the gradual warming that had followed the last Ice Age. The cold lasted for the 1,300-year interval known as the Younger Dryas (YD) before the climate began to warm again.In North America, large animals known as megafauna, such as mammoths, mastodons, saber-tooth tigers and giant short-faced bears, became extinct. The...

2010-04-12 11:25:00

Study suggests that Ice Age climate change did not pose significant challenges to first Americans Paleoindian groups* occupied North America throughout the Younger Dryas interval, which saw a rapid return to glacial conditions approximately 11,000 years ago. Until now, it has been assumed that cooling temperatures and their impact on communities posed significant adaptive challenges to those groups. David Meltzer from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas, USA, and Vance Holliday from...

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2010-04-12 09:13:23

Did a change in climate or an extraterrestrial impact bring an end to the beasts and people that roamed the Southwest shortly after the last ice age? A team of researchers from the University of Arizona has revisited evidence pointing to a cataclysmic event thought by many scientists to have wiped out the North American megafauna "“ such as mammoths, saber tooth cats, giant ground sloths and Dire wolves "“ along with the Clovis hunter-gatherer culture some 13,000 years ago. The...

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2009-07-21 07:57:54

University of Oregon-led research team digs up strongest evidence yet for a controversial cosmic event A 17-member team has found what may be the smoking gun of a much-debated proposal that a cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago ripped through North America and drove multiple species into extinction. In a paper appearing online ahead of regular publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of Oregon archaeologist Douglas J. Kennett and colleagues from nine...

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2009-02-25 14:15:00

Landscapers in Colorado have discovered more than 80 stone tools in the city of Boulder that appear to have originated in the Clovis era. Biochemical analysis at the University of Colorado suggests that some of the tools were used to butcher ice-age camels and horses that roamed North America until their extinction about 13,000 years ago. The study is the first of its kind to discover protein residue from extinct camels on North American stone tools and the second to find horse protein...

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2009-01-02 08:30:00

Abundant tiny particles of diamond dust exist in sediments dating to 12,900 years ago at six North American sites, adding strong evidence for Earth's impact with a rare swarm of carbon-and-water-rich comets or carbonaceous chondrites, reports a nine-member scientific team. These nanodiamonds, which are produced under high-temperature, high-pressure conditions created by cosmic impacts and have been found in meteorites, are concentrated in similarly aged sediments at Murray Springs, Ariz.,...

2008-07-21 06:00:34

By Kevin Mayhood, The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio Jul. 21--NORTH BEND, Ohio -- The theory is as wild as it is controversial: that a comet, which left no crater, exploded over Canada almost 13,000 years ago, wiped out the woolly mammoth and other land giants and nearly decimated the first known human culture in North America. "I thought that was a bunch of nonsense," said Kenneth Tankersley, a University of Cincinnati anthropologist. But by the end of June, Tankersley was a convert. Now...

2008-04-08 00:00:08

By Sandi Doughton SEATTLE - Hold the potty humor, please, but archaeologists digging in a dusty cave in Oregon have unearthed fossilized feces that appear to be the oldest biological evidence of humans in North America. The ancient poop dates back 14,300 years. If the results hold up, that means the continent was populated more than 1,000 years before the so-called Clovis culture, long believed to be the first Americans. "This adds to a growing body of evidence that the human presence...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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