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Latest Cluster bombs Stories

2012-12-08 05:02:00

The U.S. is the only member of NATO that is not a States Party to the Mine Ban Treaty, and the only country in the Western Hemisphere, aside from Cuba, that has not joined. Geneva, Switzerland (PRWEB) December 07, 2012 At the Twelfth Meeting of States Parties to the Mine Ban Treaty, the United States observer delegation stated that the U.S. will be announcing the outcome of its three-year review of its landmine policy–and whether or not it will join the...

2010-10-19 08:00:00

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 19 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Aerojet, a GenCorp (NYSE: GY) company, recently demonstrated its alternative warhead technologies in a tactical missile flight environment. The successful demonstrations were conducted to test Aerojet's solution to eliminate unexploded ordnance (UXO) on the U.S. Army's Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS). The three-mission, missile-launched warhead tests were the first live-fire, missile-delivered performance tests conducted by...

2008-12-05 16:38:00

WASHINGTON, Dec. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Ninety-four (94) countries -- including most U.S. NATO allies -- signed a Convention on Cluster Munitions treaty banning cluster bombs in Oslo, Norway. The U.S. was not present to join the majority of the world's nations in stopping the use of these weapons, which kill or maim mostly civilians and children. President-Elect Barack Obama has said he supports initiatives to minimize civilian casualties from conventional weapons, including cluster...

2008-12-03 08:46:00

OSLO, Norway, Dec. 3 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- More than 80 countries - including most U.S. allies in NATO - began signing a treaty banning cluster bombs in Oslo, Norway today. The U.S. government is not there and the Bush administration has refused to join the majority of the world's nations in stopping the use of these weapons, which kill or maim mostly civilians and children. President-Elect Barack Obama has said he supports initiatives to minimize civilian casualties from conventional...

2006-09-01 09:45:08

By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - Clearing unexploded cluster bombs used by Israel in Lebanon during the month-long war, many of them U.S.-manufactured, could take 10 years, a British-based demining group said on Friday. "We will be clearing unexploded cluster munitions from the rubble of the villages of southern Lebanon for another decade," said Simon Conway, director of Land mine Action. "That is the grim reality," he told reporters in Geneva. Before the recent war between...