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2010-07-28 19:09:06

New study suggests primary role of ocean temperature in the distribution of marine biodiversity, documents significant overlap between areas of high human impact and diversity hotspots In an unprecedented effort that will be published online on the 28th of July by the international journal Nature, a team of scientists mapped and analyzed global biodiversity patterns for over 11,000 marine species ranging from tiny zooplankton to sharks and whales. The researchers found striking similarities...

2010-07-12 10:37:00

NEW YORK, July 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Nearly half (45.9 percent) of executives report that complexity of implementation is their organizations' biggest challenge in improving enterprise risk management, according to a recent online poll from Deloitte. "Executives relying on conventional wisdom often miss the unconventional realities that can make risk management appear insurmountably complex," said Frederick Funston, a principal with Deloitte & Touche LLP and co-author of the newly...

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2010-06-08 09:10:00

A new study pinpoints the genetic changes that enable Tibetans to thrive at altitudes where others get sick. In the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team has identified a gene that allows Tibetans to live and work more than two miles above sea level without getting altitude sickness. A previous study published May 13 in Science reported that Tibetans are genetically adapted to high altitude. Now, less than a month later, a second study by...

2010-06-02 21:06:29

Study shows math mentors much more effective in beginning of career A new Northwestern University study of mentor-prot©g© relationships has found something that parents and children have known for a long time: the generation gap is real, and it matters. It not only affects communication but also who mentors young mathematicians successfully and who does not. Northwestern researchers analyzed 60 years of a "family tree" of mathematicians and the doctoral students they advised. They...

2010-05-28 13:43:22

Three new UCSF studies describe the wide reach of the tobacco industry and its influence on young people, military veterans and national health care reform. The analyses will be published in a special July edition of the American Journal of Public Health titled "Modeling to Advance Tobacco Control Policy." Findings are available online at http://www.ajph.org/first_look.shtml and coincide with a global event designed to heighten awareness of tobacco use and its negative health effects: World...

2010-05-10 14:52:05

'South-South' biotech collaborations boost health, economies: Study The availability of more affordable drugs, vaccines and diagnostics that would help countless people worldwide is the foremost benefit expected from a growing number of collaborations between biotech firms in developing countries, according to a study to be published Mon. May 12 in the UK journal Nature Biotechnology. Researchers from five developing countries, together with colleagues at Canada's McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for...

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2010-05-05 11:34:18

DNA testing of garden ferns sold at plant nurseries in North Carolina, Texas, and California has found that plants marketed as American natives may actually be exotic species from other parts of the globe. The finding relied on a new technique called "DNA barcoding" that uses small snippets of DNA to distinguish between species, in much the same way that a supermarket scanner uses the black lines in a barcode to identify cans of soup or boxes of cereal. A team of North Carolina researchers...

2010-04-30 13:35:00

Children normally experience flights of fancy, including imaginary friends and conversations with stuffed animals, but some of them are also having hallucinations and delusions which might be the early signs of psychosis. A study of British 12-year-olds that asked whether they had ever seen things or heard voices that weren't really there, and then asked careful follow-up questions, has found that nearly 6 percent may be showing at least one definite symptom of psychosis. The children who...

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2010-04-26 11:25:00

University investment decisions can deepen job losses and other financial cuts when market collapses carve into budget-supporting endowment funds, a new study by the National Bureau of Economic Research found. Researchers say the findings show that universities need to re-evaluate investment portfolios and policies to cushion the blow when market downturns wither endowments, a growing economic engine for colleges over the last two decades. "A secretary at Harvard probably had no idea her...

2010-03-29 08:34:54

Imagine if your computer only allowed you to see one line at a time, no matter what you were doing "“ reading e-mail, looking at a Web site, doing research. That's the challenge facing blind computer users today. But new research from North Carolina State University is moving us closer to the development of a display system that would allow the blind to take full advantage of the Web and other computer applications. "Right now, electronic Braille displays typically only show one line of...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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