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Latest Coastal geography Stories

Old Maps And Dead Clams Help Solve Coastal Boulder Mystery
2012-05-01 08:09:26

Perched atop the sheer coastal cliffs of Ireland's Aran Islands, ridges of giant boulders have puzzled geologists for years. What forces could have torn these rocks from the cliff edges high above sea level and deposited them far inland? While some researchers contend that only a tsunami could push these stones, new research in The Journal of Geology finds that plain old ocean waves, with the help of some strong storms, did the job. And they're still doing it. The three tiny Aran...

Image 1 - Crust Below Mississippi Delta Still Subsiding, Just Much Slower
2012-04-04 04:21:55

New data suggests that the Mississippi Delta is still sinking, but at a much slower rate than previously estimated. A new paper published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters reports these new findings. Geoscientists arrived at this new conclusion after comparing detailed sea-level reconstructions from different areas of coastal Louisiana. The new findings not only reveal new information about the subsidence of the Mississippi Delta, but also admonishes the continuous...

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2012-03-12 10:14:10

As global warming heats up the Earth´s oceans, one ecosystem stands to be severely threatened: Coral reefs. However, new research has given scientists to be hopeful about the fate of these coral reefs. An international team of researchers has studied a coral population in South-East Asian waters that had survived a bleaching event. What was significant about this reef was that it had also survived another bleaching event 12 years earlier in 1998. The researchers published their...

Scientists Discover World’s Deepest-Living Creature
2012-02-24 05:29:28

Over a mile beneath the Earth´s surface in the pitch black depths of the world´s deepest cave, a team of Spanish and Portuguese scientists have discovered several new species of animals, one of which they are describing as the deepest terrestrial animal known to man. The tiny arthropod, already dubbed with the Latin name Plutomurus ortobalaganensis, is one of four newly discovered species of wingless arthropods known to entomologists as springtails. Part of a subclass of...

Explaining Dune Field Patterns
2012-02-08 05:04:26

In a study of the harsh but beautiful White Sands National Monument in New Mexico, University of Pennsylvania researchers have uncovered a unifying mechanism to explain dune patterns. The new work represents a contribution to basic science, but the findings may also hold implications for identifying when dune landscapes like those in Nebraska´s Sand Hills may reach a “tipping point” under climate change, going from valuable grazing land to barren desert. The study was...

2012-01-26 13:23:25

Discoveries made in some underwater caves by Texas &M University at Galveston researchers in the Bahamas could provide clues about how ocean life formed on Earth millions of years ago, and perhaps give hints of what types of marine life could be found on distant planets and moons. Tom Iliffe, professor of marine biology at the Texas A&M-Galveston campus, and graduate student Brett Gonzalez of Trabuco Canyon, Calif., examined three "blue holes" in the Bahamas and found that layers...

2011-11-18 03:24:59

Restoration reduces sea-level rise impacts over next 100 years A new study, led by PRBO Conservation Science (PRBO), projects a bleak future for San Francisco Bay's tidal marshes under high-end sea-level rise scenarios that are increasingly likely. PRBO and colleagues found that in the worst case scenario 93% of San Francisco Bay's tidal marsh could be lost in the next 50-100 years [with 5.4 feet or 1.65 meters of sea-level rise, low sediment availability and no significant restoration]....


Latest Coastal geography Reference Libraries

Coral Reef
2013-04-20 15:49:21

Coral reefs are submerged structures consisting of calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of small animals found in marine waters that enclose few nutrients. The majority of coral reefs are constructed from stony corals, which then consist of polyps that come together in groups. The polyps are like small sea anemones, to which they are very closely related. Unlike the sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which provide support and protections...

Mudflats
2013-04-19 21:07:34

Mudflats, or otherwise known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is left behind by tides or rivers. They’re found in sheltered regions such as bayous, lagoons, estuaries, and bays. Mudflats might be seen geologically as exposed layers of bay mud, a result from the deposition of estuarine silts, marine animal detritus, and clays. The majority of the sediment in a mudflat is within the intertidal zone, therefore the flat is submerged and exposed about twice per day. In...

Salt Marsh
2013-04-19 21:04:15

A salt marsh, also otherwise known as a coastal salt marsh or a tidal marsh, is a coastal ecosystem in the upper coastal intertidal zone that lies between the land and the open salt water or brackish water that is routinely flooded by the tides. It’s dominated by dense stands of salt-tolerant plants, for example, herbs, grasses, or low shrubs. These plants originate from all around the globe and are important to the stability of the salt marsh in trapping and binding sediments. Salt marshes...

Basic Ocean Terms
2013-02-05 12:52:11

Image Credit: Meteorologist Joshua Kelly When meteorologists are forecasting for ocean-going vessels, there are a few terms that we need to understand. The first term is wavelength. Wavelength is defined as the distance between two crests or between two troughs as seen in the image above. The example above highlights the crest to crest concept of wavelength. The next term that we use is wave height, and to determine this, we first must look at the wave when it passes our station. When...

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Word of the Day
maffling
  • To stammer.
  • Present participle of maffle, to stammer.
  • A simpleton.
The word 'maffle' may come from a Dutch word meaning 'to move the jaws' or a French word meaning 'having large cheeks'.