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Latest Coati Stories

Socialness In Carnivores Linked To Size Of Frontal Cortex
2013-10-09 05:49:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A growing body of research from Michigan State University reveals that the region of the brain that makes humans and primates social creatures may play a similar role in carnivores. Sharleen Sakai, professor of neuroscience, has studied spotted hyenas, lions, and most recently the raccoon family to find a correlation between the size of the animals' frontal cortex and their social nature. The current study, published in the journal...


Latest Coati Reference Libraries

South American Coati, Nasua nasua
2013-01-01 15:39:23

The South American coati (Nasua nasua), also known as the ring-tailed coati, is native to South America. Its range is large and includes lowland tropical and subtropical habitats. The only South American country where this species does not occur is Chile. It can be found at elevations of up to 8,200 feet. This species is locally known as quati in the Portuguese language. It holds thirteen recognized subspecies. The South American coati can reach an average body length between thirty-three...

Olingo
2012-10-30 11:18:04

Olingo The olingo is the common name for the genus Bassaricyon, which contains five species of procyonids. The olingos are native to Central and South America, holding a range that extends from Peru to Nicaragua. These animals prefer a habitat within rainforests at altitudes of up to 6,561 feet. This species resembles the kinkajou physically and has similar habits. However, olingos do not have long tongues or a prehensile tail, and have other physical differences. Although members of this...

White-nosed Coati, Nasua narica
2012-07-05 15:19:41

The white-nosed coati (Nasua narica) is a species of coati that is related to raccoons. Its common local names include the antoon, the pizote, and the tejon. The latter name, tejon, is primarily used in Mexico and it means badger. It is native to the Americas, and lives at altitudes between sea level and 9,800 feet. Its range stretches through New Mexico and southeastern Arizona and throughout Central America and Mexico. It reaches the farthest areas of northwestern Colombia, but its southern...

38_2fbcfc43bbc8904401d88cf626e04906
2009-02-16 18:16:45

The Kinkajou (Potos flavus), also known as the Honey Bear, is a species of mammal found in the rainforests of Central and South America. It is the only member of the family genus Potos. It is related to the olingo, ringtail, cacomistle, raccoon, and coati. These animals are sometimes mistaken for ferrets or monkeys, but are not related. The name Honey Bear is derived from the fact that in captivity it will eat honey, however, in the wild it has never been observed to do so. An adult...

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