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Latest Cobitis Stories

6c0a5c54b7a1f33fba792d5dc079ef011
2009-01-15 07:01:39

A Spanish research team has researched and described for the first time in Europe the spread of the invasive dojo loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) fish species.


Latest Cobitis Reference Libraries

39_757ebed3d41fb21f2d93697c5926a4a1
2007-04-10 16:50:35

The Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) is a species of freshwater fish. It is a member of the carp family (family Cyprinidae) of order Cypriniformes. It is common in streams and small rivers throughout the Gila River and San Pedro River systems in Arizona, New Mexico, and Sonora. The species is of drab coloration and unremarkable appearance, and reaches a maximum overall length of 2.36 in (6 cm). It can live to at least five years of age. The species is sometimes referred to as the loach...

39_008f7b8a34586e808866742eefef3219
2007-04-04 14:42:57

The Kuhli loach, Pangio kuhlii, is a small worm-like freshwater fish belonging to the loach family (Cobitidae). It originates in Indonesia and the Malay Peninsula. Physical description The Kuhli loach is an eel-shaped fish, elongated with slightly compressed sides, and very small fins. The dorsal fin starts behind the middle of the body, and the anal fin well behind this. The eyes are covered with a transparent skin. The body has 15 to 20 dark brown to black vertical bars, and the gaps...

39_86c21ff70cc75ac58b848f5650fcc757
2007-04-04 14:22:31

The Weather loach or Dojo loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus), is a freshwater fish in the loach family Cobitidae. They are native to Asia but are also popular as an aquarium fish. The name Weather loach is shared with several species including the European weather loach (Misgurnus fossilis) and the spotted weather loach (Cobitis taenia). The name weather loach comes from their ability to detect changes in barometric pressure and react with frantic swimming or standing on end. This is because...

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Word of the Day
zill
  • One of a pair of round metal cymbals attached to the fingers and struck together for rhythm and percussion in belly dancing.
The word 'zill' comes from a Turkish word meaning "cymbals".
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