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Latest cocaine addiction Stories

2009-03-03 07:03:00

CORAL GABLES, Fla., March 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Catalyst Pharmaceutical Partners, Inc. (Nasdaq: CPRX), a biopharmaceutical company that acquires or in-licenses, develops and commercializes prescription drugs for the treatment of drug addiction, today announced modifications to its previously announced product development program. In order to extend its cash resources well into 2010, Catalyst has decided to halt enrollment of new subjects into its ongoing U.S. Phase II trial evaluating CPP-109...

2009-01-09 07:03:00

CORAL GABLES, Fla., Jan. 9 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Catalyst Pharmaceutical Partners, Inc. (Nasdaq: CPRX), a biopharmaceutical company that acquires, in-licenses, develops and commercializes prescription drugs for the treatment of drug addiction, announced today that it has reached its patient enrollment target in its Phase II trial evaluating CPP-109 for the treatment of cocaine addiction. CPP-109 is Catalyst's tablet formulation of vigabatrin being developed as a treatment for cocaine...

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2008-05-27 14:03:05

The first large-scale analysis of proteins in the brains of monkeys addicted to cocaine reveals new information on how long-term cocaine use changes the amount and activity of various proteins affecting brain function.The identified changes are more numerous and long-lasting than previously thought, which may provide a biological explanation for why cocaine addiction is so difficult to overcome, according to Scott E. Hemby, Ph.D. of Wake Forest University School of Medicine, senior author of...

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2008-02-18 09:10:00

Study in mice shows drug's effects extend beyond dopamine, brain's 'reward' chemical UPTON, NY - Many studies on cocaine addiction - and attempts to block its addictiveness - have focused on dopamine transporters, proteins that reabsorb the brain's "reward" chemical once its signal is sent. Since cocaine blocks dopamine transporters from doing their recycling job, it leaves the feel-good chemical around to keep sending the pleasure signal. Now a new study conducted at the U.S. Department of...

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2006-02-16 07:05:55

Discovery could lead to new treatments, researchers say Experiments in rats have linked the craving for cocaine to a specific molecule that appears to train the brain to crave the drug. The finding could lead to addiction treatments that would block this biologic trigger, experts say. The researchers found that a protein, called orexin A, acts on an area of the brain that is key to priming the brain for addictive drugs. In experiments with rats, they show that orexin A causes an adaptation...

2005-10-19 12:59:20

Researchers are now understanding in greater detail the molecular machinery underlying the short-term brain changes that produce the high of cocaine, as well as the longer-term changes behind addiction. Their findings offer hope for targeted drugs that can short-circuit that addiction machinery. In the October 20, 2005, issue of Neuron, researchers led by Eric J. Nestler and Arvind Kumar of The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have pinpointed a key molecular mechanism by which...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.