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2011-12-05 21:41:25

Young pigs are known to be particularly susceptible to intestinal problems, which not only discomfort the animals but also slow their growth — and thus increase the cost of meat production.  The most common cause of intestinal problems in suckling pigs is the parasite Isospora suis, which according to the literature can be treated by a class of drugs known as sulfonamides. Anja Joachim and colleagues at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) have...

2011-10-14 09:51:11

Researchers funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), among others, have taken the first step in developing a new type of vaccine to protect chickens against coccidiosis, the most important parasite of poultry globally. A vaccine of this type -- based on proteins from the coccidiosis bug rather than being derived from a live parasite -- could be produced on a larger scale than is currently possible so could be used to provide much more widespread...

2011-04-26 09:56:00

MONHEIM, Germany, April 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- - First Launches in Germany and Austria to Follow Shortly Bayer today announced that the European Commission has approved two new companion animal products: Veraflox(R) (pradofloxacin) and Procox(R) (emodepside and toltrazuril). Veraflox(R) is the first next-generation veterinary fluoroquinolone antibiotic for the treatment of bacterial infection in cats and dogs. Procox(R) is the first and only licensed combination treatment for...

2011-01-04 14:02:00

Biologist shows why some strains are more dangerous than others About one-third of the human population is infected with a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii, but most of them don't know it. Though Toxoplasma causes no symptoms in most people, it can be harmful to individuals with suppressed immune systems, and to fetuses whose mothers become infected during pregnancy. Toxoplasma spores are found in dirt and easily infect farm animals such as cows, sheep, pigs and chickens. Humans can be...

2005-10-18 22:18:45

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Keep pet cats inside, stop feeding strays, cook meat sufficiently and reconsider the way the veterinary profession and public health agencies think -- and teach -- about the zoonotic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Such are the recommendations of Milton M. McAllister, a professor of pathobiology in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He delivered that message at 8:30 a.m., Oct. 19 (2:30 p.m. CDT Tuesday, Oct. 18) in...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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