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Cockatoo Reference Libraries

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Galah
2006-09-25 15:06:34

The Galah, Eolophus roseicapilla, is one of the most common bird of the cockatoo family. It occupies open country in almost all of mainland Australia. Galahs are absent only from the driest areas and the far north of Cape York Peninsula. They appear to have been self-introduced to Tasmania. They are common in some metropolitan areas, for example Perth and Melbourne, and common to abundant in...

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo
2006-09-25 15:03:29

The Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo, Calyptorhynchus funereus, is a large cockatoo native to the south-east of Australia. It is found from Eyre Peninsula to south and central eastern Queensland. In some areas they have adapted to humans and can be often seen in many parts of urban Sydney and Melbourne. They are one of the more well-loved and characteristic birds of southern Australia. Adult...

Red-tailed Black Cockatoo
2006-09-25 15:00:26

The Red-tailed Black Cockatoo, Calyptorhynchus banksii, is a large cockatoo native to Australia, being more common in arid areas. Usually found in eucalypt woodlands, or along water courses, these seed-eating cockatoos are commonly seen in large flocks in the north of the country. Populations of the south-east region of Australia are threatened by clearing of native habitat. The Red-tailed...

Palm Cockatoo
2006-09-25 14:59:15

The Palm Cockatoo, Probosciger aterrimus, is a large black parrot of the cockatoo family. It is found in northern Queensland and New Guinea. It can also be found in Cape York, although it is threatened there due to habitat loss. They are in high demand for the pet trade due to its unusual appearance. It measures around 21.6 to 23.6 inches in length and weighs between 1.1 and 2.2 lbs. It is a...

Short-billed Black-Cockatoo
2006-09-15 10:20:14

The Short-billed Black Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris is a cockatoo endemic to south-western Australia.

Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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