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Latest Cold seep Stories

2014-08-26 12:21:39

STARKVILLE, Miss., Aug. 26, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New questions about geology, oceanography and seafloor ecosystems are being raised because of research by a Mississippi State University geologist. Lead author Adam Skarke, assistant professor of geosciences at MSU, worked with researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other institutions on a scientific team that discovered methane seeps in unlikely places along the seafloor on the northern part of the U.S....

methane seep
2014-08-26 05:01:55

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Geologists from Mississippi State University, Brown University, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and Maryland-based Earth Resources Technology, Inc. have discovered more than 500 bubbling methane vents on the seafloor of the northern part of the US Atlantic margin, various media outlets reported on Sunday. Previously, only three of these vents (which are also known as seeps) had been identified, but according to Terrence McCoy of...

Four Previously Unknown Marine Species Discovered Near Scotland
2013-12-29 08:25:21

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online Four species of sea creatures previously unknown to science have been discovered in deep water off the west coast of Scotland, BBC News and other media outlets reported over the weekend. The British news agency reported that the new species were discovered during surveys conducted by Marine Scotland, the government agency dedicated to maintaining the prosperity and environmental sustainability of the country’s seas. They were...

Methane Seeps Of The Deep Sea Are A Bacteria Feast For Lithodid Crabs
2013-10-08 09:54:33

Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR) Photos and analyses reveal more about a highly specialized food web The bottom of the deep sea is largely deserted. Oases occur for example at cold seeps where water transports dissolved elements from the seabed: Specialized microbes convert methane and sulfate from sea water to hydrogen sulfide releasing carbon dioxide. Highly adapted bacteria, many of which live in symbiosis with worms and clams, use the hydrogen sulfide for their...

Worm Causing Methane Release Ocean Bed
2013-08-13 08:36:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A super-charged methane seep has been discovered in the ocean off the coast of New Zealand. The seep has created its own unique food web, resulting in elevated amounts of methane escaping from the ocean floor into the water column, according to scientists at Oregon State University. Methane is a greenhouse gas 23 times more potent than carbon dioxide at warming our atmosphere. Most of the methane in the seep is likely consumed by...

Oasis For Deep-sea Life Created From Sunken Wood
2013-01-22 13:50:33

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Trees do not grow in the deep sea, nevertheless sunken pieces of wood can develop into oases for deep-sea life - at least temporarily until the wood is fully degraded. A team of Max Planck researchers from Germany now showed how sunken wood can develop into attractive habitats for a variety of microorganisms and invertebrates. By using underwater robot technology, they confirmed their hypothesis that animals from hot and cold seeps would be attracted to the wood due...

2012-03-12 21:00:31

A team of scientists has documented for the first time that animals can and do consume Archaea — a type of single-celled microorganism thought to be among the most abundant life forms on Earth. Archaea that consume the greenhouse gas methane were in turn eaten by worms living at deep-sea cold seeps off Costa Rica and the West Coast of the United States. Archaea perform many key ecosystem services including being involved with nitrogen cycling, and they are known to be the main...

Image 1 - Hot Meets Cold At New Deep-Sea Ecosystem
2012-03-08 10:27:49

Habitats overlap at Jaco Scar in depths off Costa Rica Decades ago, marine scientists made a startling discovery in the deep sea. They found environments known as hydrothermal vents, where hot water surges from the seafloor and life thrives without sunlight. Then they found equally unique, sunless habitats in cold areas where methane rises from seeps on the ocean bottom. Could vents and seeps co-exist in the deep, happily living side-by-side? No one thought so. Until now....

2012-03-07 12:28:48

Researchers discover unknown species at juncture where hot and cold habitats collide Among the many intriguing aspects of the deep sea, Earth's largest ecosystem, exist environments known as hydrothermal vent systems where hot water surges out from the seafloor. On the flipside the deep sea also features cold areas where methane rises from "seeps" on the ocean bottom. It's extremely rare to find both habitat types intersecting in one place, but that's what researchers found and explored...

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2009-10-16 08:00:01

Sediment samples from methane cold seeps off California shed light on mystery Scientists have identified an unexpected metabolic ability in a symbiotic community of deep-sea microorganisms. It may help solve a lingering mystery about the world's nitrogen cycle. The element nitrogen is a critical part of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, and therefore essential to all life. Although nitrogen is plentiful on Earth--it represents 78 percent of the atmosphere, by volume--the element...


Latest Cold seep Reference Libraries

Bathymodiolus Childressi
2013-04-16 18:54:23

Bathymodiolus childressi is a species of deepwater mussel, a marine bivalve mollusk species belonging to the family Mytilidae. Although this species has been known since the year 1985, it was formerly described as a species in 1998. This species resides in cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. It is stenothermal species living in temperatures ranging from 6.5 to 7.2 degrees Celsius. This mussel harbors intracellular methanotrophic bacteria within its gills. This bacteria provides carbon...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'