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Latest Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Stories

2009-11-09 14:41:47

Aggressive tumors lacking p53 protein stop dead in their tracks when p53's sister protein -- TAp63 -- steps in Oncologists have had their hands tied because more than half of all human cancers have mutations that disable a protein called p53. As a critical anti-cancer watchdog, p53 masterminds several cancer-fighting operations within cells. When cells lose p53, tumors grow aggressively and often cannot be treated. These tumors might be tough, but they're not invincible, suggests a new study...

2009-11-04 15:00:26

A chemical cousin of the common antibiotic tetracycline might be useful in treating spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a currently incurable disease that is the leading genetic cause of death in infants. This is the finding of a research collaboration involving Adrian Krainer, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and scientists from Paratek Pharmaceuticals and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. SMA is caused by mutations in a gene called Survival of Motor Neuron 1...

2009-11-03 12:42:12

The introduction of high-throughput laboratory methods has greatly increased the pace of research into the genetics of complex diseases. Instead of focusing only on one or a few coding variants in a small sample of individuals, the ability to accurately and efficiently genotype many individuals and to cover more of the variation within individual genes has resulted in genetic studies with greater statistical power. "Laboratory Methods for High-Throughput Genotyping," from Howard Edenberg and...

2009-10-26 15:05:31

Gene copy number variations of the same region, 16p11.2, are already linked to autism An international team of researchers led by geneticist Jonathan Sebat, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), has identified a mutation on human chromosome 16 that substantially increases risk for schizophrenia. The mutation in question is what scientists call a copy number variant (CNV). CNVs are areas of the genome where the number of copies of genes differs between individuals. The CNV is located...

2009-10-02 08:54:45

Discovery could lead to treatments for learning and memory deficits, particularly Noonan's syndrome As most good students realize, repeated studying produces good memory. Those who study a lot realize, further, that what they learn tends to be preserved longer in memory if they space out learning sessions between rest intervals. Neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have now discovered how this so-called "spacing effect" is controlled in the brain at the level of individual...

2009-08-24 15:33:12

 A research team led by Associate Professor Jonathan Sebat, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has developed a sensitive and accurate way of identifying gene copy number variations (CNVs). The method, which is described in a paper published online ahead of print in Genome Research, uses new DNA sequencing technologies to look for regions of the genome that vary in copy number between individuals in the population. Capable of detecting a wide range of different classes of...

2009-08-18 10:25:00

Why is it that you can instantly recall your own phone number but have to struggle with your mental Rolodex to remember a new number you heard a few moments ago? The two tasks "feel" different because they involve two different types of memory "“ long-term and short-term, respectively "“ that are stored very differently in the brain. The same appears to be true across the animal kingdom, even in insects such as the fruit fly.Assistant Professor Josh Dubnau, Ph.D., of Cold Spring...

2009-08-05 14:02:46

Vectors derived from retroviruses are useful tools for long-term gene transfer because they allow stable integration of transgenes and propagation into daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors are preferred because they can transduce non-proliferating cellular targets. These vectors can be engineered to target specific tissues. In the August issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc8_09.dtl), François-Loïc Cosset and colleagues...

2009-07-01 16:13:52

Microbial populations have traditionally been studied in carefully controlled, laboratory-grown cultures. New metagenomic approaches are being developed to study these organisms in environmental or medical samples. The July issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc7_09.dtl) presents a method developed by Holger Daims from the University of Vienna (http://www.microbial-ecology.net/daims.asp) for quantifying populations of microorganisms in a variety of naturally...

2009-06-02 14:55:00

Oligophrenin-1, faulty in mental retardation, plays a vital pre-synaptic role in normal neural signalingBrain cells, or neurons, transmit electrical signals efficiently only when they recycle tiny cellular sacs that store signaling chemicals called neurotransmitters. When a neuron is stimulated, the sacs are expelled into the synapse"”the tiny junction between nerve cells"”where they release the chemicals, which neighboring cells in turn soak up.Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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