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Latest Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Stories

2011-12-13 22:36:37

Something rotten never smelled so sweet. This is what members of a team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) are telling one another as they discuss a new finding they did not expect to make. They have discovered that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) — the flammable, highly toxic gas that we usually associate with the smell of rotten eggs in landfills and sewers — plays an important role in the regulation of a signaling pathway implicated in biological malfunctions...

2011-11-23 14:00:00

Anthony Scotto, proprietor of the popular Blackstone and Rare650 Steakhouses, is proud to announce the grand opening of another extraordinary restaurant on Long Island â“ Insignia Prime Steak & Sushi located at 610 Nesconset Highway in Smithtown. Insignia is expected to open for business at the end of November. During the first week of business, 50% of every check will be donated to cancer research at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Smithtown, NY (PRWEB) November 23,...

2011-11-14 11:32:32

A cell's genome maintains its integrity by organizing some of its regions into a super-compressed form of DNA called heterochromatin. In the comparatively simple organism fission yeast, a cellular phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi) plays an essential role in assembling heterochromatin, which keeps the compressed DNA in an inactive or "silent" state. Central to this process is a large protein complex that physically anchors various molecules involved in heterochromatin assembly to the...

2011-10-19 20:20:33

OPHN1 is found to be essential for mGluR-dependent long-term depression at synapses Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have solved part of a puzzle concerning the relationship between changes in the strength of synapses — the tiny gaps across which nerve cells in the brain communicate — and dysfunctions in neural circuits that have been linked with drug addiction, mental retardation and other cognitive disorders. A team led by CSHL Professor Linda Van Aelst...

2011-10-17 10:19:55

At the same time that a cell's DNA gets duplicated, a third of it gets super-compacted into repetitive clumps called heterochromatin. This dense packing serves to repress or "silence" the DNA sequences within–which could wreck the genome if activated–as well as regulate the activity of nearby genes. When the cell divides, the daughter cells not only inherit a copy of the mother cell's DNA, but also the exact pattern in which that DNA is clumped into heterochromatin. This...

2011-10-10 09:09:47

In order for cells of different types to maintain their identities even after repeated rounds of cell division, each cell must "remember" which genes were active before division and pass along that memory to its daughter cells. Cells deal with this challenge by deploying a "bookmarking" process. In the same way a sticky note marks the last-read page in a book, certain molecules tag the active genes in a cell so that, after it divides, the same genes are reactivated right away in the new...

2011-10-05 19:32:27

Findings reveal that deficiency of the SMN protein in peripheral tissues might also contribute to SMA pathology A new study from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) reports surprising results that suggest that the devastating neuromuscular disease, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), might not exclusively affect the motor neurons in the spinal cord as has long been thought. The new findings suggest that defects in peripheral tissues such as liver, muscle, heart, etc., might also contribute to...

2011-10-05 05:53:07

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Autism is one of the most common genetic alterations, caused by a deletion of the 27-gene cluster on chromosome 16. By generating mouse models of autism, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) provided the first evidence that inheriting fewer copies of these genes leads to features resembling those used to diagnose children with autism. "Children normally inherit one copy of a gene from each parent. We had the tools to see whether copy number changes...

Evidence Found For Genetic Basis Of Autism
2011-10-04 04:32:58

[ Watch the Video ] Models of autism show that gene copy number controls brain structure and behavior Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered that one of the most common genetic alterations in autism -- deletion of a 27-gene cluster on chromosome 16 -- causes autism-like features. By generating mouse models of autism using a technique known as chromosome engineering, CSHL Professor Alea Mills and colleagues provide the first functional evidence that inheriting...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.