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Latest Collective animal behavior Stories

2014-01-16 12:28:17

International Research Team Headed by NYU's Maurizio Porfiri Demonstrates Breakthrough in Machine Learning NEW YORK, Jan. 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- No machine is better at recognizing patterns in nature than the human brain. It takes mere seconds to recognize the order in a flock of birds flying in formation, schooling fish, or an army of a million marching ants. But computer analyses of collective animal behavior are limited by the need for constant tracking and measurement data for...

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2012-08-24 19:32:28

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online [ Watch the Video ] Simulations have helped scientists answer some lingering questions regarding the evolution of fish group formation. Researchers reported in the journal Science that they have found evidence that collective motion in animal groups like schools of fish can evolve as a finely tuned defense against attack from predators. Iain Couzin, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Princeton who...

Fish Follow The Rules To School
2011-11-08 10:28:20

The rules of school are simple: it is all about watching the kid nearest to you and making sure you do what they do. Researchers at the mathematics department at Uppsala University, together with biologists at Sydney University have shown that fish apply similar rules when traveling in small shoals. Some of the most mesmerizing sights in the natural world are seen in the collective motion of fish schools and shoals. In the ocean, vast schools of hundreds of thousands of fish can form which...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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