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Latest Colony Stories

Fungus Cell Looks Like The 405 Freeway
2013-07-18 10:17:49

UCLA [ Watch the Video Nuclear dynamics in a fungal chimera ] No, those are not cars darting along a busy highway. The glowing specks you're seeing in this video are millions of nuclei flowing through the tube-like filaments, or hyphae, of a single fungus cell. The video was produced as part of a study by UCLA mathematician Marcus Roper's research group that was the first to measure and explain this dynamic movement of nuclei in the cells of a fungus. "It's complex, beautiful and...

Evolution Of Multicellular Life Sparked By Bacteria
2012-10-24 13:36:16

Bacteria have a bad rap as agents of disease, but scientists are increasingly discovering their many benefits, such as maintaining a healthy gut. A new study now suggests that bacteria may also have helped kick off one of the key events in evolution: the leap from one-celled organisms to many-celled organisms, a development that eventually led to all animals, including humans. Published this month in the inaugural edition of the new online journal eLife, the study by University of...

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2009-04-20 10:49:09

Unique footage shows 'waltzing' and 'minueting' Scientists at the Cambridge University have discovered that freshwater algae can form stable groupings in which they dance around each other, miraculously held together only by the fluid flows they create. Their research was published today in the journal Physical Review Letters. The researchers studied the multicellular organism Volvox, which consists of approximately 1,000 cells arranged on the surface of a spherical matrix about half a...

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2009-02-19 14:40:35

Single-celled algae took the leap to multicellularity 200 million years ago Some algae have been hanging together rather than going it alone much longer than previously thought, according to new research. Ancestors of Volvox algae made the transition from being a single-celled organism to becoming a multicellular colony at least 200 million years ago, during the Triassic Period. At that time, Earth was a hot-house world whose inhabitants included tree ferns, dinosaurs and early mammals....

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2006-05-30 14:00:00

When single-celled organisms such as sperm crack their whip-like appendages called flagella, the beating sets them in motion. But in certain colonies of green algae, flagella also boost nutrient uptake, according to surprising new research. In the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the University of Arizona and Brown University explain how flagella allow these algae to get the energy they need to multiply and create colonies - the...

2006-03-03 18:15:00

By Barbara Liston ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - Puerto Rican Gov. Anibal Acevedo-Vila denounced on Friday a new congressional proposal for a two-part referendum on the Caribbean island's legal status, saying the ballot was written in favor of statehood. The bill, presented to the U.S. Congress on Thursday, came after a presidential task force called on U.S. lawmakers to set a date for a plebiscite on Puerto Rico's legal status, reinvigorating long debate over whether it should seek statehood,...


Latest Colony Reference Libraries

Atlantic Fire Ascidian, Pyrosoma atlanticum
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Pyrosoma atlanticum is a species of colonial tunicate found in temperate waters worldwide, usually between 50°N and 50°S. It is most plentiful at depths below 800 feet. It is found in colonies that are pelagic and move throughout the water column. In the evening the colony will move closer to the surface and descend back by dawn. Large colonies can rise and descend more than 2,500 feet in a single day. A colony of this species is cylindrical and can grow up to 2 feet long and 2.5 inches...

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