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Latest Colugo Stories

2011-07-28 12:50:53

Gripping tightly to a tree trunk, at first sight a colugo might be mistaken for a lemur.

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2008-11-12 10:00:00

The closest living relatives of primates most notable for their ability to glide from tree to tree over considerable distances — are more diverse than had previously been believed.

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2008-02-07 17:05:00

The "flying" lemur of Malaysia is the champion of all gliding mammals. Researchers are discovering how these animals move with the help of a miniature backpack outfitted with accelerometers.


Latest Colugo Reference Libraries

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2007-06-25 08:31:32

The Sunda Flying Lemur, Galeopterus variegatus, also known as the Malayan Flying Lemur, is a species of Colugo. It is one of only two species of flying lemur, the other being the Philippine Flying Lemur which is found only in the Philippines. The Sunda flying lemur is found throughout Southeast Asia in Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore. The Malayan Flying Lemur is in fact not a lemur and does not really fly. Instead, it glides as it leaps among trees. It is arboreal and mainly...

42_31d1f85bea40451f43f5c4a1f53ea79a
2007-01-02 11:16:54

Colugos are arboreal gliding mammals found in South-east Asia. There are just two species each in its own genus, which makes up the entire family Cynocephalidae and order Dermoptera. Though they are the most capable of all mammal gliders, they cannot actually fly. They are also known as cobegos or flying lemurs. Colugos are fairly large for a tree-dwelling mammal. They are about 13.78 to 15.75 in (35 to 40 cm) long and 2.2 to 4.41 lbs (1 or 2 kg) in weight. They are comparable to a...

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Word of the Day
zill
  • One of a pair of round metal cymbals attached to the fingers and struck together for rhythm and percussion in belly dancing.
The word 'zill' comes from a Turkish word meaning "cymbals".
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