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Latest Columbia Center for Children Stories

2014-03-26 16:08:03

Decreased exposure to air pollution associated with increases in key protein in brain development Decreased exposure to air pollution in utero is linked with improved childhood developmental scores and higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key protein for brain development, according to a study looking at the closure of a coal-burning power plant in China led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public...

2012-06-26 14:15:20

Phthalate commonly used in vinyl flooring is found in nearly 100 percent of mothers studied Prenatal exposure to a ubiquitous household chemical called butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP) can increase a child's risk for developing eczema, according to research conducted at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health. Widely used in vinyl flooring, artificial leather and other materials, BBzB can be slowly released into air in homes. Details...

2012-04-30 20:06:29

While chlorpyrifos is no longer registered for household use in the US, it continues to be widely used around the world, as well as on many food and agricultural products throughout the US Even low to moderate levels of exposure to the insecticide chlorpyrifos during pregnancy may lead to long-term, potentially irreversible changes in the brain structure of the child, according to a new brain imaging study by researchers from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the...

2011-02-10 14:57:37

Effects on IQ appear to be similar to lead exposure When the EPA phased out the widespread residential use of chlorpyrifos and other organophosphorus (OP) insecticides in 2000-2001 because of risks to child neurodevelopment, these compounds were largely replaced with pyrethroid insecticides. But the safety of these replacement insecticides remained unclear, as they had never been evaluated for long-term neurotoxic effects after low-level exposure. In the first study to examine the effects of...

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2009-07-20 11:25:00

Air pollution during prenatal development may be partially to blame for a child's lower IQ, researchers reported on Monday. Writing in the journal Pediatrics, researchers from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Mailman School of Public Health found that exposure to air pollutants, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, can result in a child's lower intelligence quotient (IQ). PAHs can come from burning substances such as coal, diesel, oil and...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.