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Latest Common descent Stories

Evolution Of Species Does Not Always Follow Darwin's Theories
2013-12-23 04:19:44

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Evolutionary scientists have long argued that species that live together must evolve in different ways in order to avoid direct competition with each other, but new research published Sunday in the journal Nature suggests otherwise. A team of researchers led by Dr. Joe Tobias of Oxford University's Department of Zoology studied ovenbirds, one of the most diverse families of birds in the world, in order to conduct an in-depth...

2011-06-14 23:06:41

A new study provides support for Darwin's hypothesis that the struggle for existence is stronger between more closely related species than those distantly related. While ecologists generally accept the premise, this new study contains the strongest direct experimental evidence yet to support its validity. "We found that species extinction occurred more frequently and more rapidly between species of microorganisms that were more closely related, providing strong support for Darwin's theory,...

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2010-05-13 09:25:38

First large-scale formal quantitative test confirms Darwin's theory of universal common ancestry More than 150 years ago, Darwin proposed the theory of universal common ancestry (UCA), linking all forms of life by a shared genetic heritage from single-celled microorganisms to humans. Until now, the theory that makes ladybugs, oak trees, champagne yeast and humans distant relatives has remained beyond the scope of a formal test. This week, a Brandeis biochemist reports in Nature the results of...

2009-11-13 13:40:44

UCLA biologists, colleagues solve mystery contemplated by Charles Darwin When Charles Darwin visited the Falkland Islands during the voyage of the Beagle in 1835, he saw a wolf-like species, wrote about it in his diaries and correctly commented that it was being hunted in such large numbers that it would soon become extinct. Darwin was baffled by how this animal got on the islands, and it figured heavily in the formation of his ideas on evolution by natural selection. Now, UCLA biologists and...

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2009-04-30 08:37:02

Scientists at Scripps Research make molecules that evolve and compete, mimicking behavior of Darwin's finches As described in an article published this week in an advance, online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the work demonstrates some of the classic principles of evolution. For instance, research shows that when different species directly compete for the same finite resource, only the fittest will survive. The work also demonstrates how, when...

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2008-12-17 15:57:04

Here's another argument against intelligent design. An evolutionary geneticist from the Universit© de Montr©al, together with researchers from the French cities of Lyon and Montpellier, have published a ground-breaking study that characterizes the common ancestor of all life on earth, LUCA (Last Universal Common Ancestor). Their findings, presented in a recent issue of Nature, show that the 3.8-billion-year-old organism was not the creature usually imagined. The study changes ideas...

2008-06-17 03:00:15

By Michael Ruse TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - I want to talk about Darwinism - the theory of evolution of the 19th-century English naturalist Charles Robert Darwin. Before you start to groan and say that you don't think you could read another thing on the science-and-religion clash and on why Intelligent Design should or should not be taught in schools, let me assure you that that is not what I want to talk about. I want to talk about Darwin's theory itself - first introduced to the world,...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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