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2011-04-03 08:00:00

NEW ORLEANS, April 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- A pooled analysis of the SPIRIT II, III, IV and COMPARE trials presented today further reinforces the positive clinical performance of Abbott's (NYSE: ABT) market-leading XIENCE V® Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System. As part of the analysis of all four trials, two-year results on the safety and efficacy of XIENCE V compared to TAXUS® Liberte® and TAXUS® Express2(TM)...

2009-01-14 08:51:05

'COMPARE' provides global positioning system for health-care policyThe RAND Corporation today launched an online tool to provide policymakers and interested parties with a unique way of understanding and evaluating the effects and unintended consequences of health care reform proposals certain to be introduced in the new 111th Congress and beyond.COMPARE (Comprehensive Assessment of Reform Efforts) is a first-of-its-kind online resource that synthesizes what is known about the current heath...

2009-01-13 12:00:00

'COMPARE' provides global positioning system for health care policy WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The RAND Corporation today launched an online tool to provide policymakers and interested parties with a unique way of understanding and evaluating the effects and unintended consequences of health care reform proposals certain to be introduced in the new 111th Congress and beyond. COMPARE (Comprehensive Assessment of Reform Efforts) is a first-of-its-kind online resource that...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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