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Latest Comparison of the health care systems in Canada and the United States Stories

2014-08-05 17:01:33

McGill University First study to assess state-by-state progress finds greater progress in northeastern states compared to western states Racial differences in life expectancy have declined nationally but still vary substantially across U.S. states, according to a new study by McGill University researchers. The findings, published in the journal Health Affairs, suggest that state policies could play a key role in further reducing racial differences in mortality. The researchers...

2014-06-24 08:29:35

Yet Canadians in the dark about cancer survival rates OTTAWA, June 24, 2014 /CNW/ - Cancer isn't always a matter of life and death anymore - today, an increasing number of Canadians are living with cancer as a chronic condition. However, the majority of Canadians and the healthcare system have not necessarily responded to this shift. "The fact is, 63 per cent of Canadian cancer patients live longer than five years after diagnosis(i), and if a cancer patient survives past one year,...

2014-05-06 14:47:59

Findings offer insights into population-level health effects that could occur under Affordable Care Act In the first four years after Massachusetts instituted comprehensive health reform in 2006, mortality in the state decreased by 2.9% compared with similar populations in states that didn't expand health coverage, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. They estimated that Massachusetts' health reform law, which provided near-universal coverage,...

2013-11-12 12:19:31

Meanwhile, United States has much higher medical costs and worse outcomes than Over the last decade, the biggest driver of the high health care costs in the United States has been neither the aging of the population nor the large numbers of tests and treatments being prescribed. Instead, new Johns Hopkins-led analysis described in the Nov. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests it has been the increasing prices of drugs, medical devices and hospital costs...

2013-11-01 10:32:55

Countries facing severe shortages and poor distribution of health workers could benefit from training and deploying more mid-level health workers, such as midwives, nurses, medical assistants and surgical clinicians, according to a study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization today. In countries where such health workers have been deployed, the clinical outcomes for certain services were just as good and – in some cases – even better than when physicians performed...

2013-10-18 12:11:52

Outpatient visits rose, ER visits remained same after CHIP insurance expansion -- while ER visits rose in a comparison group of young adults with less insurance coverage As the nation's health care system prepares for uninsured Americans to gain health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, a question hangs over crowded hospital emergency departments: Will the newly insured make fewer ER visits than they do today? According to the results of a new University of Michigan...

2013-10-09 13:34:15

State public health departments do not necessarily lose funding when merged with larger Medicaid programs, according to a just-released study. The findings from this first-of-a-kind research should help allay concerns that when such mergers occur they automatically lead to cutbacks in public health, says lead author Paula Lantz, PhD, who is chair of the Department of Health Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS). "The concern has been...

2013-09-09 20:40:18

A new study by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) finds no evidence that primary care physicians provide "second-class" care to Medicaid, uninsured and other patients who rely on the nation's safety-net system. The study, which appears in the September issue of the journal Health Affairs, challenges previous claims that the care provided to low-income and vulnerable patients is substandard. The new study was supported by the...

2013-07-09 11:21:12

Health reform initiatives need to improve perceived quality, cost and accessibility of primary care to reduce low value care Patients with low socioeconomic status use emergency and hospital care more often than primary care because they believe hospital care is more affordable and convenient, and of better quality than care provided by primary care physicians, according to the results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The...

2013-06-25 12:07:19

Hospital performance on publicly reported conditions (acute myocardial infarction [heart attack], congestive heart failure, and pneumonia), may potentially be used as a signal of overall hospital mortality rates, according to a study by Marta L. McCrum, M.D., of Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, and colleagues. Using national Medicare data from 2,322 acute care hospitals, the authors examined whether mortality -rates for publicly reported medical conditions are correlated with...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'