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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Comparison of the health care systems in Canada and the United States Stories

2013-11-12 12:19:31

Meanwhile, United States has much higher medical costs and worse outcomes than Over the last decade, the biggest driver of the high health care costs in the United States has been neither the aging of the population nor the large numbers of tests and treatments being prescribed. Instead, new Johns Hopkins-led analysis described in the Nov. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests it has been the increasing prices of drugs, medical devices and hospital costs...

2013-11-01 10:32:55

Countries facing severe shortages and poor distribution of health workers could benefit from training and deploying more mid-level health workers, such as midwives, nurses, medical assistants and surgical clinicians, according to a study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization today. In countries where such health workers have been deployed, the clinical outcomes for certain services were just as good and – in some cases – even better than when physicians performed...

2013-10-18 12:11:52

Outpatient visits rose, ER visits remained same after CHIP insurance expansion -- while ER visits rose in a comparison group of young adults with less insurance coverage As the nation's health care system prepares for uninsured Americans to gain health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, a question hangs over crowded hospital emergency departments: Will the newly insured make fewer ER visits than they do today? According to the results of a new University of Michigan...

2013-10-09 13:34:15

State public health departments do not necessarily lose funding when merged with larger Medicaid programs, according to a just-released study. The findings from this first-of-a-kind research should help allay concerns that when such mergers occur they automatically lead to cutbacks in public health, says lead author Paula Lantz, PhD, who is chair of the Department of Health Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS). "The concern has been...

2013-09-09 20:40:18

A new study by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) finds no evidence that primary care physicians provide "second-class" care to Medicaid, uninsured and other patients who rely on the nation's safety-net system. The study, which appears in the September issue of the journal Health Affairs, challenges previous claims that the care provided to low-income and vulnerable patients is substandard. The new study was supported by the...

2013-07-09 11:21:12

Health reform initiatives need to improve perceived quality, cost and accessibility of primary care to reduce low value care Patients with low socioeconomic status use emergency and hospital care more often than primary care because they believe hospital care is more affordable and convenient, and of better quality than care provided by primary care physicians, according to the results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The...

2013-06-25 12:07:19

Hospital performance on publicly reported conditions (acute myocardial infarction [heart attack], congestive heart failure, and pneumonia), may potentially be used as a signal of overall hospital mortality rates, according to a study by Marta L. McCrum, M.D., of Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, and colleagues. Using national Medicare data from 2,322 acute care hospitals, the authors examined whether mortality -rates for publicly reported medical conditions are correlated with...

2013-06-06 19:54:35

More indigent patients sought treatment though care remained free When health care reform in Thailand increased payments to public hospitals for indigent care, more poor people sought medical treatment and infant mortality was reduced, even though the cost of medical care remained free for the poor, a new study shows. The study, “The Great Equalizer: Health Care Access and Infant Mortality in Thailand,” funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, found that...

2013-06-06 16:22:56

More Indigent Patients Sought Treatment Though Care Remained Free CHICAGO, June 6, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- When health care reform in Thailand increased payments to public hospitals for indigent care, more poor people sought medical treatment and infant mortality was reduced, even though the cost of medical care remained free for the poor, a new study shows. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100914/DC63872LOGO) The study, "The Great Equalizer: Health Care Access...

2013-05-28 21:21:11

Among men with prostate cancer, African Americans experience longer treatment delays after being diagnosed than Caucasians. That is the finding of an analysis published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study suggests that efforts are needed to reduce racial disparities in prostate cancer care in order to provide earlier treatment for African Americans. To see if there is a difference in the time from cancer diagnosis to initiation of...