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Latest Computed tomography angiography Stories

2011-07-18 07:04:18

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is an effective way to diagnose kids with heart problems. Now, newer techniques are making CTA safer for pediatric patients. "Traditionally, pediatric patients who require coronary artery imaging have undergone a cardiac catheterization, which is an invasive procedure with a significant radiation dose, requiring sedation or anesthesia for all patients," B. Kelly Han, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Minneapolis Heart...

2011-07-01 06:53:04

(Ivanhoe Newswire)"”Studies have shown that African Americans are at a greater risk of heart attacks, but what causes this? According to a recent study, African Americans have greater levels of non-calcified plaque consisting of buildups of soft deposits deep in the arterial walls. This type of plaque is more vulnerable to rupturing and causing blood clots which could lead to a heart attack or other cardiovascular event. Joseph Schoepf, M.D., professor of radiology and medicine and...

2011-06-28 13:18:11

Researchers may have discovered one reason that African Americans are at increased risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular events. According to a new study published online in the journal Radiology, African Americans have increased levels of non-calcified plaque, which consists of buildups of soft deposits deep in the walls of the arteries that are not detected by some cardiac tests. Non-calcified plaque is more vulnerable to rupturing and causing a blood clot, which could lead to a...

2011-05-26 06:55:40

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A new study reveals having a CT angiography test leads to more prescriptions for medications, more tests, and more procedures. However, the incidence of heart attacks or cardiac death among low-risk patients remained the same, regardless of whether they had a CT angiography test or not. Coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography can detect plaque buildup in the heart vessels and is sometimes used as a screening tool to assess the risk of a heart attack. The...

2011-05-10 13:25:05

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found that computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), meant to improve detection of life-threatening pulmonary embolisms (PE), has led to over-diagnosis and over treatment of this condition. These findings, which appear in May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. may continue to grow worse as the as the use of CT scans continue to rise. The introduction in 1998 of multi-detector row CTPA revolutionized the way...

2011-03-01 14:17:46

Breakthrough science is cost-effective and easy to use A new non-surgical post-mortem technique that has the potential to revolutionize the way autopsies are conducted around the world has been pioneered by forensic pathologists and radiologists at the University of Leicester in collaboration with the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust. The technique developed by a team in the East Midlands Forensic Pathology Unit, at the University of Leicester, has been published today (1 March) in...

2011-01-18 19:21:08

Emergency medicine researchers with the University of Cincinnati (UC) are advocating a new strategy for diagnosing a common but dangerous condition in the emergency room. Pulmonary embolism, or PE, is a potentially lethal disease in which a blood clot, usually from the legs, travels to the lungs and becomes lodged in a pulmonary artery. But the most common way of testing for PEs, a computed tomography angiography (CTA), comes with so many side effects that researchers in emergency medicine...

2010-12-27 08:11:43

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ People who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a sleep disorder associated with obesity, have more non-calcified or "bad" plaque in their coronary arteries, according to this study. "Our study reveals that individuals with obstructive sleep apnea are prone to developing an aggressive form of atherosclerosis that puts them at risk for impaired blood flow and cardiovascular events," U. Joseph Schoepf, M.D., professor of radiology and medicine and director of...

2010-12-06 07:42:22

(Ivanhoe Newswire)--Despite having lower amounts of coronary artery calcification, African Americans are at increased risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular events compared with Caucasians. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston, S.C. suggests that increased levels of non-calcified plaque, which consists of buildups of soft deposits deep in the walls of the arteries that are not detected by some cardiac tests are the culprit. Non-calcified plaque...

2010-11-30 13:59:04

In a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), researchers say they may have an explanation as to why African Americans, despite having lower amounts of coronary artery calcification, are at increased risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular events compared with Caucasians. The answer, according to researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston, S.C., may be increased levels of non-calcified...


Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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