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Latest Cone snail Stories

2012-04-04 20:29:44

Researchers study special forms of a conotoxin that blocks transmission of pain signals Hidden in the mud, the cone snail Conus purpurascens lies in wait for its victims. It attracts its prey, fish, with its proboscis, which can move like a worm, protruding from the mud. Once a fish approaches out of curiosity, the snail will rapidly shoot a harpoon at it, which consists of an evolutionarily modified tooth. The paralyzed victim then becomes an easy meal. It takes the venomous cone snail...

2010-10-27 20:30:03

Scientists have discovered the secret of how an amazing sea snail injects its venom after shooting a harpoon-like tooth into its prey "” or some unlucky swimmer "” at jetliner speeds. The creatures, called cone snails, use a highly specialized structure that instantly pumps the paralyzing venom through the tooth and into its target. Their study appears in ACS' monthly Journal of Proteome Research. Helena Safavi-Hemami, Anthony Purcell and colleagues note that cone snails live...

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2009-12-11 10:45:00

Name all the venomous animals you can think of and you probably come up with snakes, spiders, bees, wasps and perhaps poisonous frogs. But catfish? A new study by University of Michigan graduate student Jeremy Wright finds that at least 1,250 and possibly more than 1,600 species of catfish may be venomous"”far more than previously believed. The research is described in a paper published online Dec. 4 in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology. Lest anyone have concerns about...

2009-05-21 08:18:47

A study of venomous snails on remote Pacific islands reveals genetic underpinnings of an ecological phenomenon that has fascinated scientists since Darwin. The research, by University of Michigan evolutionary biologists Tom Duda and Taehwan Lee, is scheduled to be published online May 20 in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. In the study, Duda and Lee explored ecological release, a phenomenon thought to be responsible for some of the most dramatic diversifications of living things in Earth's...

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2008-10-08 09:20:00

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $4 million to a group of Philippine and American scientists led by Oregon Health & Science University to aid in the discovery of new molecules and biofuels technology from marine mollusks for development in the Philippines. The project will concentrate its research in the Philippine archipelago whose waters are inhabited by an estimated 10,000 marine mollusk species, or about a fifth of all the known species, and are regarded by marine...

2007-05-04 15:00:00

WILMINGTON, Del., May 4 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Two first-place winning teens went to Walt Disney World and the Kennedy Space Center last week as winners of the DuPont Challenge National Science Essay Awards Program. Masooma Raza, 14, a freshman at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Va., and Yocheved Kramer, a junior at Manhattan High School for Girls in New York City, won the $3,000 prize in the junior and senior divisions respectively. The DuPont...

2006-08-23 07:51:23

SALT LAKE CITY -- Venom from an ocean snail may have benefits for people with addictions, depression and Parkinson's disease, University of Utah researchers reported Monday. They said they produced a synthetic version of the toxin that can block or stimulate receptors that release chemicals in the brain. "A snail is a treasure chest. They have tens of thousands of compounds," said J. Michael McIntosh, professor or biology and psychiatry. McIntosh, working with cone-snail researcher...

2006-07-09 18:32:19

LONDON (Reuters) - A new pain drug based on the venom of a deadly sea snail was launched in Britain on Monday, offering hope to patients with chronic pain who do not respond to or cannot tolerate treatments like morphine. Japanese drugmaker Eisai Co Ltd, which acquired European rights to Prialt from Ireland's Elan Corp Plc, is marketing the medicine first in Britain before rolling it out in other European markets. The drug is the synthetic equivalent of a substance produced by the...

2006-03-02 18:25:38

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Primates may have evolved color vision not to find the ripest, tastiest fruit but to detect that tell-tale blush on someone else's rump, U.S. researchers reported on Thursday. The cone structures in the eye that help detect color seem exquisitely tuned to skin tones, the team at the California Institute of Technology reports. "For a hundred years, we've thought that color vision was for finding the right fruit to eat when it was ripe," Mark Changizi, a...

2005-06-10 20:55:00

A cone snail toxin discovered by Melbourne researchers has proven to have great potential for easing pain and could provide an improved treatment for neuropathic pain associated with diabetes. Melbourne based company Metabolic Pharmaceuticals Limited recently announced successful results in preclinical trials of the toxin. The company will begin clinical trials in humans this month to firstly test the safety of the toxin in normal males, and later its effectiveness in treating the neuropathic...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.