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Latest Conservation reliant species Stories

2006-01-24 08:00:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent FRONT ROYAL, Virginia (Reuters) - Zoe purrs and grunts when she hears women talking. Just like any house cat wanting her ears scratched, she rubs against the chain-link fence invitingly. But Zoe, who lives at the Smithsonian National Zoo's Conservation and Research Center in Front Royal, Virginia, is no kitty cat; she's a rare clouded leopard. And the specialists at the center are among the few animal experts in the world who have been able to...

2006-01-24 08:25:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent FRONT ROYAL, Virginia -- Zoe purrs and grunts when she hears women talking. Just like any house cat wanting her ears scratched, she rubs against the chain-link fence invitingly. But Zoe, who lives at the Smithsonian National Zoo's Conservation and Research Center in Front Royal, Virginia, is no kitty cat; she's a rare clouded leopard. And the specialists at the center are among the few animal experts in the world who have been able to get...

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2005-12-31 10:20:40

WASHINGTON -- Three little brothers whose antics have drawn crowds at the National Zoo for more than a year are all grown up now and getting kicked out of the house. Marah, Jalan and Besar - Sumatran tiger cubs - are approaching 200 pounds apiece, an adult's size. Their mother is pushing them away, another sign that they are no longer little kittens even though they still play that way. Next week, the 19-month-old males are being shipped to Landry's Downtown Aquarium in Denver to become...

2005-12-20 02:57:41

By Krittivas Mukherjee KOLKATA, India (Reuters) - India will start counting tigers next month in the world's largest habitat for the big cats using specially-designed computer programmes to avoid duplication in recording pugmarks, officials said on Tuesday. The government was criticised by conservationists after reports in March said the entire tiger population at the Sariska tiger reserve, one of the most high profile, had been killed by poachers and that numbers across the country...

2005-11-22 09:05:25

By Heath Kelly JAIPUR, India (Reuters) - Indian police have busted a tiger poaching ring responsible for killing at least 10 animals in one of its premier wildlife parks, an officer said on Tuesday. Four poachers living in the forests surrounding the Ranthambhore reserve had confessed to killing 10 tigers and a leopard, police superintendent Alok Vasisth said. "More arrests will be made and will include those who received these tigers and those who smuggled them," he said. Local...

2005-08-05 10:38:48

NEW DELHI (Reuters) - An Indian task force said on Friday that the country's tigers were under siege from poachers and people living in protected reserves, and called for thousands of villagers to be relocated to save the endangered big cat. There was national shock after reports in March that the population of 16-18 tigers at a leading sanctuary in western India could be wiped out by poachers within a year, and that the risks were similar at other reserves. Responding to the outcry, Prime...

2005-07-18 10:00:00

NEW DELHI -- India reported a dramatic fall in the tiger population at one of its showcase reserves on Monday and conservationists said poachers were to blame. Numbers of the endangered big cats in the Ranthambhore sanctuary in the western desert state of Rajasthan fell to 26 from 47 in 2004, but authorities said the numbers could be lower because of a faulty headcount in the last census. "Tiger numbers at Ranthambhore have fallen and it's because of poaching and unscientific counting methods...

2005-06-16 22:05:00

(Vladivostok, Russia) -- Results of the latest full range survey indicate that tiger numbers in Russia appear to be stable, say the coordinators of a 2005 winter effort to count the animals, led by the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society. After a massive winter endeavor to determine distribution and abundance of tigers in the Russian Far East, the last stronghold of Siberian tigers, researchers report that approximately 334-417 adult tigers remain in the region, along with 97-112...

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2005-04-12 18:35:00

GENEVA (AP) -- Even in their own reserves, they are rampantly poached for their "lucky" collar bones, fashionable skins and decorative claws. When they flee onto human territory, they are poisoned, electrocuted, shot or trapped. There is nowhere left for India's dwindling tiger population to turn. The large cat's rapidly plummeting numbers prompted a United Nations conservation body to write Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Tuesday, urging him to accept help in saving the largest of...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.