Quantcast
Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Continental collision Stories

2012-03-12 21:04:59

Geologists at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne have come up with a new idea as to how the earliest continents were formed The earth's structure can be compared to an orange: its crust is the peel supported by the earth's heavy mantle. That peel is made up of a continental crust 30 to 40 kilometers thick. It is much lighter than the thinner oceanic crust and protrudes from the earth's mantle because of its lower density, like an iceberg in the sea. "According to the current theory, the...

Image 1 - When Continents Collide
2012-03-01 09:00:58

A new twist to a 50 million-year-old tale Fifty million years ago, India slammed into Eurasia, a collision that gave rise to the tallest landforms on the planet, the Himalaya Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. India and Eurasia continue to converge today, though at an ever-slowing pace. University of Michigan geomorphologist and geophysicist Marin Clark wanted to know when this motion will end and why. She conducted a study that led to surprising findings that could add a new wrinkle to...

2011-05-27 21:44:24

What would we see and what would we learn if we were able to cut North America in half, pull it apart, and look at the resulting cross section through the continent, from the surface all the way down to its very deepest mantle roots? Although it sounds like an impossible undertaking, Philip Hammer of the University of British Columbia and colleagues have done just that. Utilizing geological and geophysical data collected over more than 20 years as part of the Canadian LITHOPROBE project,...

992f53ab0dafd7016419fd3aae9841441
2010-05-28 10:54:02

Geological investigations in the Himalayas have revealed evidence that when India and Asia collided some 90 million years ago, the continental crust of the Indian tectonic plate was forced down under the Asian plate, sinking down into the Earth's mantle to a depth of at least 200 km kilometers. "The subduction of continental crust to this depth has never been reported in the Himalayas and is also extremely rare in the rest of world," said Dr Anju Pandey of the National Oceanography Centre in...

2009-03-23 10:26:17

U.S. geologists say they've determined that as rocks become hotter in the Earth's crust, they become better insulators but poorer conductors. The University of Missouri scientists said their findings from a study of how well rocks conduct heat at different temperatures provide insights into how magmas are formed and will possibly lead to better models of continental collision and the formation of mountain belts. These results shed important light on a geologic question: how large bodies of...

eca97d86d0613e4aa3f09e8f9e03ef4b1
2009-03-19 08:28:14

MU researchers found that strain heating can play an important role in crustal melting A University of Missouri study published in Nature this week has found that the Earth's crust melts easier than previously thought. In the study, researchers measured how well rocks conduct heat at different temperatures and found that as rocks get hotter in the Earth's crust, they become better insulators and poorer conductors. This finding provides insight into how magmas are formed and will lead to...

2005-06-29 21:28:21

(Kingston, ON) "“ Geologists at Queen's University have discovered that the time it takes for mountain ranges to form is millions of years shorter than previously thought. This controversial finding could have implications for our understanding of other geological processes that shaped the Earth, says Professor James Lee and postdoctoral fellow Alfredo Camacho of Queen's Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Department. The study will appear in the June 30 edition of the...

2005-06-14 17:25:31

Boulder, Colo. "“ The July-August issue of the GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA BULLETIN includes several newsworthy items. Topics include: a possible 3-10-year warning mechanism for North American west-coast earthquakes; discovery of a 4600-year history of tsunamis on the Oregon coast; and present-day tilting of the Great Lakes region. Representatives of the media may obtain complimentary copies of articles by contacting Ann Cairns at acairns@geosociety.org. Please discuss articles of...