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Latest Conus Stories

Cone Snails' Role In Medicine Could Threaten Them With Extinction
2013-12-24 12:37:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Valued for millennia for their decorative shells, marine cone snails are now grabbing the interest of pharmacologists who believe the snails’ powerful venom could eventually be used to formulate equally powerful drugs to treat a range of illnesses. Unfortunately, many species of cone snails are currently threatened and their plight has been largely ignored, according to a new report in the open access journal PLOS ONE. In the...

Mollusks Could Be Responsible For Future Medications
2013-01-30 11:48:19

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Two new mollusk-based studies from the Oregon Health & Science University show that new cutting-edge medications could be developed by simply looking to the sea. Because of accessibility issues, the ocean has always been a difficult place for identifying and utilizing the natural resources located there. Sadly, when many of these resources were tapped, they were done so in an unsustainable manner. The first study, which was...

2006-07-09 18:32:19

LONDON (Reuters) - A new pain drug based on the venom of a deadly sea snail was launched in Britain on Monday, offering hope to patients with chronic pain who do not respond to or cannot tolerate treatments like morphine. Japanese drugmaker Eisai Co Ltd, which acquired European rights to Prialt from Ireland's Elan Corp Plc, is marketing the medicine first in Britain before rolling it out in other European markets. The drug is the synthetic equivalent of a substance produced by the...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.