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Latest Cooperation Stories

2014-06-27 11:47:44

Harvard University Research suggests voting may be key to cooperation with future generations Whatever the solutions to preserving our world's natural resources might be, it seems clear that answers won't come overnight. How, then, can we be sure the steps we take today won't jeopardize the fate of future generations? The answer, researchers say, may lie with one of cornerstones of modern society – democracy. Using a series of modified public goods "games," Professor of...

2014-03-04 13:07:46

In academic circles at least, women tend to cooperate with same-sex individuals of higher or lower rank less often than men do. So say researchers who report evidence on March 3 in the Cell Press journal Current Biology. The findings are based on a study of the publication records of professors working at 50 North American universities. "People are often upset to hear evidence of sex differences in behavior," says Joyce Benenson of Harvard University. "But the more we know, the more easily...

2013-12-11 11:53:46

UMD psychologist, computer scientists use game theory to explain complex human behavior You're shopping for holiday gifts when you spot someone pocketing a nice pair of leather gloves. What do you do? A new study by University of Maryland researchers appearing this week in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B predicts that whether you alert a manager to the theft or decide to do nothing may depend on whether you're shopping in a local store where you know the owners or in a city far...

2013-10-03 16:07:32

Wealth inequality can encourage people to cooperate when they would otherwise have no incentive to do so, according to a new study published in Nature Communications. "In many groups and societies, the temptation to defect is high, which means that cheaters are much better off than cooperators," says IIASA researcher Ulf Dieckmann, who worked on the study along with IIASA researcher Ádám Kun. For example, he says, if a train ticket is very expensive and the probability that cheaters are...

2013-06-26 16:38:12

While men tend to match their partners' emotions during mutual cooperation, woman may have the opposite response, according to new research Cooperation is essential in any successful romantic relationship, but how men and women experience cooperation emotionally may be quite different, according to new research conducted at the University of Arizona. Ashley Randall, a post-doctoral research associate in the UA's John & Doris Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences and the UA's...

Ultimatum Game Shows Chimps Can Practice Fairness
2013-01-15 04:39:10

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Chimpanzees possess a sense of fairness that scientists previously attributed as being solely human, a new study from the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory University, and Georgia State University demonstrates. To determine how sensitive chimps are to the reward distribution between two individuals if both need to agree on the outcome, the researchers played the Ultimatum Game with them. The findings of this study,...

2012-12-05 12:56:19

The study, by IIASA Evolution and Ecology Program postdoctoral fellow Tatsuya Sasaki, provides a simple new model that ties punishment by social exclusion to the benefits for the punisher. It may help explain how social exclusion arose in evolution, and how it promotes cooperation among groups. "Punishment is a common tool to promote cooperation in the real world," says Sasaki. "And social exclusion is a common way to do it." From reef fish to chimpanzees, there are many examples of...

2012-09-27 14:12:56

For two decades, evolutionary scientists have been locked in a debate over the evolved functions of three distinctive human behaviors: the great readiness we show for cooperating with new people, the strong interest we have in tracking others' reputations regarding how well they treat others, and the occasional interest we have in punishing people for selfishly mistreating others. In an article published today in the journal PLoS ONE, researchers at UC Santa Barbara's Center for...

2012-09-19 16:47:53

The more people rely on their intuitions, the more cooperative they become, new research shows It's an age old question: Why do we do good? What makes people sometimes willing to put "We" ahead of "Me?" Perhaps our first impulse is to be selfish, and cooperation is all about reining in greed. Or maybe cooperation happens spontaneously, and too much thinking gets in the way. Harvard scientists are getting closer to an answer, showing that people's first response is to cooperate and that...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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