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Latest Copepod Stories

Where Did All The Codfish Go?
2014-02-27 13:44:10

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa The mega-decline in cod and other fisheries across the North Atlantic Ocean threatens the livelihood of fishermen and communities in New England and Atlantic Canada. One suspect in the disappearance of cod and other groundfish is the food source for their young: a planktonic copepod crustacean, no larger than a grain of rice. Recent changes in local copepod populations have co-occurred with declines in fisheries elsewhere, such as the collapse of the cod...

Ocean Acidity Having Major Impact On Arctic Food Web Species
2013-12-03 06:27:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Tiny crustaceans, known as copepods, live just beneath the surface of the ocean. A research expedition to the Arctic, part of the Caitlin Arctic Survey, found that these tiny animals are more likely to battle for survival if ocean acidity continues to rise. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), revealed that copepods that move large distances, migrating vertically across a wide range of pH...

Seahorse Heads Are Perfectly Shaped For Catching Prey
2013-11-26 12:58:31

University of Texas at Austin Seahorses are slow, docile creatures, but their heads are perfectly shaped to sneak up and quickly snatch prey, according to marine scientists from The University of Texas at Austin. "A seahorse is one the slowest swimming fish that we know of, but it's able to capture prey that swim at incredible speeds for their size," said Brad Gemmell, research associate at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, which is part of the College of Natural...

Switching To A Power Stroke Helps A Tiny Marine Crustacean To Survive
2013-04-02 14:29:14

University of Texas at Austin [ Watch the Video Copepod Nauplius Swimming at 10 Degrees C ] Olympic swimmers aren't the only ones who change their strokes to escape competitors. To escape from the jaws and claws of predators in cold, viscous water, marine copepods switch from a wave-like swimming stroke to big power strokes, a behavior that has now been revealed thanks to 3-D high-speed digital holography. Copepods are tiny crustaceans found in nearly every aquatic environment on...

Fish Poop May Be Critical To Ocean Carbon Cycle
2012-10-11 12:28:11

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Professor Deborah Steinberg of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) has dedicated her professional life to investigating crustaceans and their role in the “biological pump,” which is the process by which marine life transports carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and ocean´s surface to the deep sea. This cycle removes the carbon to a depth where it contributes nothing to global warming. In a new study...

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2011-08-04 08:51:18

Tracking their dinner may be the best way to help North Atlantic right whales in Cape Cod Bay avoid being hit by recreational and commercial boats, according to a team of researchers who studied the whales for two years. "Auto-detection buoys are making a remarkable attempt at recording the whale sounds to show when whales are in the area," said Susan Parks, assistant professor of acoustics and ecology and senior research associate, Penn State Applied Research Laboratory. "But North Atlantic...

2011-06-13 14:49:26

A deep-sea mystery has been solved with the discovery that the tiny 3 mm long marine animals, eaten by herring, cod and mackerel, use the same buoyancy control as whales. Reporting this week in the journal Limnology and Oceanography, researchers from British Antarctic Survey describe how Southern Ocean copepods "“ a crustacean rich in omega-3 oil "“ 'hibernates' in the deep ocean during winter when seas are stormy and food scarce. To reach the ocean depths the copepod's oily body...

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2011-04-19 14:21:18

By David Malmquist, Virginia Institute of Marine Science A new study by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science shows that turbulence from boat propellers can and does kill large numbers of copepods"”tiny crustaceans that are an important part of marine food webs. The study"”by VIMS graduate student Samantha Bickel, VIMS professor Kam Tang, and Hampton University undergraduate Joseph Malloy Hammond"”appears in the on-line issue of the Journal of Experimental...

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2010-10-12 11:47:23

Despite its primitive structure, the North American comb jellyfish can sneak up on its prey like a high-tech stealth submarine, making it a successful predator. Researchers, including one from the University of Gothenburg, have now been able to show how the jellyfish makes itself hydrodynamically 'invisible'. The North American comb jellyfish Mnemiopsis leidyi has long been known to consume vast quantities of zooplankton. A few years ago the species became established in Northern Europe. Like...

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2008-11-11 15:45:00

Researchers say they are now using satellite monitoring of marine environments for predicting cholera outbreaks. Cholera outbreaks follow seasonal increases in sea temperature, scientists said, and this could provide an early warning system for India and Bangladesh where cholera epidemics occur regularly. Tiny animals, which increase in number with sea temperature rise, bring the cholera pathogen into the drinking water supply. The satellites were able to pick up sea temperature changes in...


Latest Copepod Reference Libraries

Elegant Firefish, Nemateleotris decora
2014-06-13 11:45:09

The elegant firefish (Nemateleotris decora) is a species of fish native to the tropical waters of the Indo-West Pacific. Its distribution ranges from Mauritius to Samoa and from Ryukyu Islands to New Calendonia. It is also known as the purple firefish and is found in depths from 82 to 230 feet. The elegant firefish prefers hard, open bottoms of reefs, sandy patches and rubble, or in deeper water it is found on the outer reef drop-offs in strong current. When startled, they will dart into...

Antarctic Silverfish, Pleuragramma antarcticum
2012-04-02 17:14:35

The Antarctic Silverfish, (Pleuragramma antarcticum), is a member of the Notothenioidei family of fish. It is widely distributed around the Antarctic, but has largely disappeared from the western side of the northern Antarctic Peninsula based on 2010 research funded by the National Science Foundation. It is also found throughout the Southern Ocean. It grows to an average size of 6 inches, but has been known to reach lengths of up to 10 inches. It is usually pink with a silver tint, and...

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2007-04-03 00:29:38

The Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, is the one of the most abundant species of fish on the planet. They can be found on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean congregating together in large schools (or swarms). They can grow up to 17.72 in (45 cm) in length and weigh more than 1.1 lb (0.5 kg). They feed on copepods, krill and small fish, and their natural predators are seals, whales, cod and other larger fish. The Atlantic herring fishery has long been an important part of the economy of New...

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Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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