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Latest Copula Stories

educationpress-082311-001
2011-08-23 13:30:17

  Psychologists at the University of Liverpool have found that children as young as two years old have an understanding of complex grammar even before they have learned to speak in full sentences. Researchers at the University's Child Language Study Centre showed children, aged two, sentences containing made-up verbs, such as 'the rabbit is glorping the duck', and asked them to match the sentence with a cartoon picture. They found that even the youngest two-year-old could identify...

2010-09-21 06:59:00

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona, September 21, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Conjugation.com (http://www.conjugation.com) innovates and releases today a new version of its proprietary conjugation engine TM (V3.0) with unique features: conjugation in AFFIRMATIVE, INTERROGATIVE, NEGATIVE modes, MODAL VERBS, TRANSLATION in 52 LANGUAGES, definitions and examples. Conjugation and translation results displayed instantaneously for 15000 verbs, translation in 52 languages. The conjugation engine TM fully...

2009-10-19 13:25:00

Little words can be very important for how we understand American films but are rarely translated into Swedish even though this is often possible, id revealed in a new thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Jenny Mattsson's thesis is about the translation of small but significant elements of the dialogue in American films. The English words well, you know, I mean and like (known as discourse particles) were studied in ten American films (including Legally Blonde, Pulp Fiction and...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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