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Latest Coral bleaching Stories

2014-08-05 16:22:29

Making Marine Protected Areas a Global Agenda Item LANDOVER, Md., Aug. 5, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Lewis Pugh announced this morning the Seven Swims in The Seven Seas for 1 Reason expedition: a long distance swim in each of the Seven Seas (the Mediterranean, Adriatic, Aegean, Black, Red, Arabian and North Sea). Already the first person to complete a long distance swim in every ocean of the world, he will be the first person to undertake a long distance swim in each of the...

It's All About Being Fat And Flexible For Corals Adapting To Climate Change
2014-07-10 03:47:46

By Pam Frost Gorder, Ohio State University Study suggests best targets for environmental conservation The future health of the world's coral reefs and the animals that depend on them relies in part on the ability of one tiny symbiotic sea creature to get fat—and to be flexible about the type of algae it cooperates with. In the first study of its kind, scientists at The Ohio State University discovered that corals—tiny reef-forming animals that live symbiotically with algae—are...

Scientists Working To Protect Australia's Great Barrier Reef
2014-07-03 14:37:23

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Australian scientists are studying degraded reefs off the Northwest Australian coast as the country marks a decade since a massive rezoning of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. “Reefs north of Exmouth have experienced large-scale bleaching in the past five years,” said Malcolm McCulloch from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at the University of Western Australia. The marine biology team is busy...

Close-up Of Coral Bleaching Event Provided By UGA Ecologists
2014-06-04 03:39:05

Beth Gavrilles, University of Georgia Study documents corals before, during and after October 2009 episode New research by University of Georgia ecologists sheds light on exactly what happens to coral during periods of excessively high water temperatures. Their study, published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography, documents a coral bleaching event in the Caribbean in minute detail and sheds light on how it changed a coral's community of algae—a change that could have long-term...

More Coral Babies Staying At Home On Future Reefs
2014-04-29 03:11:08

Nova Southeastern University It seems that coral reefs are experiencing something their human counterparts have been for years – a shrinking "empty nest" syndrome. That's right – researchers have found that increasing ocean temperatures due to climate change will soon see reefs retaining and nurturing more of their own coral larvae, leaving large reef systems less interconnected. The study brought together an international group of researchers from NSU's Oceanographic Center; the...

How To Save Reefs Containing The Most Diversity With Limited Resources
2014-04-11 09:55:31

Wildlife Conservation Society Marine scientists keen on finding patterns of coral decline and persistence in gradually warming oceans have a complex challenge: how to save reefs containing the most diversity with limited resources. In the Western Indian Ocean, researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Warwick, the ARC Centre for Excellence of Coral Reef Studies, Simon Fraser University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and other groups have found...

2014-03-25 23:01:10

HOBO® U22 Data Loggers Monitor Potentially Damaging Increases in Local Sea Temperature and Determine Effects on Coral Bourne, MA (PRWEB) March 25, 2014 At Naitauba, Fiji, a 2,000-acre island completely encircled by a coral reef, the Naitauba Reef Initiative is working with researchers from the University of the South Pacific (USP) School of Marine Studies to learn as much as possible about all aspects of the reef. Onset’s HOBO U22 Water Temperature Pro v2 data loggers are being...

Coral Reefs Hold Surprising Species Diversity
2013-12-14 04:35:27

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online It is widely known that coral reefs are being put in jeopardy by rising water temperatures caused by climate change. A team of marine biologists, led by Penn State University, has made a surprising discovery that suggests that very similar looking coral species actually differ in how they survive in harsh environments. "We've found that previously unrecognized species diversity was hiding some corals' ability to respond to climate...

Marine Pollution Impact On Corals Is Harsh, But They Can Recover
2013-11-26 14:24:00

[ Watch the Video: Protection From Marine Pollution Would Help Coral Reefs Recover ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study on coral reefs from a team of Florida and Oregon researchers has found common marine pollution doubled the rate of disease among corals and more than tripled the amount of coral bleaching, an early sign of reef stress. According to the team’s report in Global Change Biology, a three-year, controlled exposure of corals to high levels of...

A Changing Climate May Not Spell Doom For Coral Reefs After All
2013-10-30 09:18:53

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its academic partners reveals that coral reefs may be able to adapt to moderate climate warming, improving their chance of surviving through the end of this century, if there are large reductions in carbon dioxide emissions. The findings, published online in the journal Global Change Biology, also suggest corals have already adapted to part of the warming...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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