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Latest Coral reef Stories

2013-02-07 15:02:51

Researchers from the University of Bonn found out that tiny foraminifera in the oceans can save islands The climate is getting warmer, and sea levels are rising — a threat to island nations. As a group of researchers lead by colleagues from the University of Bonn found out, at the same time, tiny single-cell organisms are spreading rapidly through the world's oceans, where they might be able to mitigate the consequences of climate change. Foraminifera of the variety Amphistegina are...

2013-01-14 10:30:20

Tiny coral reef wrasses can swim as fast as some of the swiftest fish in the ocean — but using only half as much energy to do so, Australian scientists working on the Great Barrier Reef have found. By flapping their fins in a figure-eight pattern, bluelined wrasses can travel at high speeds while using 40 per cent less energy than tunas of the same size. “For a long time, people thought the best high-speed swimmers were the fishes cruising in open waters, like mackerel and...

2012-11-26 14:15:23

Humans may be able to avert major environmental catastrophes that now loom if we learn to make better use of ℠borrowed time´, an eminent marine biologist will tell the Australian Academy of Science in Canberra tomorrow. “There is mounting evidence that we have already passed or may soon pass several critical boundaries affecting life on Earth, as well as our own future wellbeing,” the director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook...

Naïve Fish Make Easy Targets For Spear Fishers
2012-11-13 15:00:01

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies Big fish that have grown up in marine reserves don´t seem to know enough to avoid fishers armed with spear guns waiting outside the reserve. The latest research by an Australian team working in the Philippines into the effects of marine reserves has found there is an unexpected windfall awaiting fishers who obey the rules and respect reserve boundaries — in the form of big, innocent fish wandering out of the reserve....

2012-10-13 04:03:37

Coastal habitats provide cost effective solutions for hazard mitigation and coral reefs may provide risk reduction benefits to 200 million people around the world Arlington, VA (PRWEB) October 11, 2012 Today in Brussels, Belgium, the German Alliance for Development Works (Alliance), United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS) and The Nature Conservancy presented the World Risk Report 2012, which shows how environmental degradation reduces the capacity of...

Coral Reef Killer May Have A New Nemesis
2012-10-08 14:15:00

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The farmer and the casual gardener know the damage that can be done by an outside pest. Through chemical and organic (for the more eco-conscious among them) pesticides, they are able to eradicate the small predators that threaten their ecosystem. But just how do you effectively clear out a pest when its attack is underwater? This week, a team of marine scientists from James Cook University´s (JCU) ARC Centre of Excellence for...

Health Of Marine Ecosystems Associated With Health Of Manatees
2012-10-03 12:40:10

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of scientists, led by George Mason University, have conducted a long-term study of manatees which may be a benchmark in determining health threats to marine mammals. The study, which ran over ten years in Belize, examined the behavioral ecology, life history and health of manatees in an area relatively undisturbed by humans. “Manatees are the proverbial ℠canaries in the mineshaft,´ as they serve as indicators...

Marine Protection Gets Local Boost In Fiji
2012-08-22 12:14:26

A new study by researchers from the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, and the Wildlife Conservation Society has found that locally managed marine protected areas within Fiji are playing an increasingly important role in the nation's strategy to protect inshore habitats. The study estimates that by 2020, locally managed marine protected areas within the Fiji Locally Managed Marine Area...


Latest Coral reef Reference Libraries

Black Sea Urchin, Diadema antillarum
2013-11-06 11:22:21

Diadema antillarum, known also as the Lime Urchin, the Long-Spined Sea Urchin, or the Black Sea Urchin, is a species of sea urchin belonging to the family Diadematidae. It is characterized by its extremely long black spines. This species is the most plentiful and significant herbivore on the coral reefs of the western Atlantic and Caribbean basin. Then the population of these sea urchins is at a healthy level, they’re the main grazers which prevent algae overgrowth of the reef....

Synaptula lamperti
2013-11-04 09:27:28

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber belonging to the family Synaptidae within the phylum Echinodermata, located on coral reefs within the Indo-Pacific region. The echinoderms are marine invertebrates and they include the sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and starfish. They’re radially symmetric and have a water vascular system that is driven by hydrostatic pressure, making them able to move around via numerous suckers known as tube feet. Sea cucumbers are typically leathery,...

Diadema setosum
2013-04-30 15:23:43

Diadema setosum is a species of sea urchin that can be found in Indo-Pacific waters. Its range extends from the Red Sea to coasts of Australia in the east, and from Japan in the north to the east coast of Africa in the south. There have been a few individuals found outside of this natural range, leading experts to believe that it was introduced by natural or manmade causes. Two individuals were found off the coast of the Kaş peninsula in Turkey in 2006. These individuals represent the first...

Lampert's Sea Cucumber, Synaptula lamperti
2013-04-30 15:18:06

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber that can be found in the waters of the Indo-Pacific. Its range includes the coastal waters of Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Micronesia. It does not have the tube feet, which are common to other species of sea cucumber, instead moving around by using a small grouping of pinnate feeding tentacles, which are always moving. It can also move by using the small, hook-like bones found along its body, attaching itself to the sea...

Black Sea Urchin, Diadema antillarum
2013-04-30 12:59:49

The black sea urchin (Diadema antillarum), also known as the lime sea urchin or the long-spined sea urchin, is a species that can be found in the Caribbean basin and the western waters of the Atlantic Ocean. It prefers to inhabit coral reefs in these areas and resides at depths of up to 32.8 feet. This species has a test, or outer shell, that is similar that of most species of sea urchin. However, this species has longer spines, a trait from which it derived one of its common names. These...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.