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Latest Coral reef Stories

2012-08-21 22:48:21

Life in the world´s oceans faces far greater change and risk of large-scale extinctions than at any previous time in human history, a team of the world´s leading marine scientists has warned. The researchers from Australia, the US, Canada, Germany, Panama, Norway and the UK have compared events which drove massive extinctions of sea life in the past with what is observed to be taking place in the seas and oceans globally today. Three of the five largest extinctions of the past...

Unless Drastic Protection Policies Are Put In Place Marine Species Are At Risk
2012-08-21 13:56:55

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online If the levels of carbon dioxide continue to increase many marine species will be harmed or won't survive It is doubtful that the current protection policies and management practices will be enough to save them. If various marine species are to survive, unconventional, non-passive methods to conserve marine ecosystems need to be considered. A group of scientists led by University of California, Santa Cruz researcher and...

How Healthy Is Your Ocean?
2012-08-16 08:58:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of researchers recently rated every coastal nation on their contribution to the health of the world's oceans. The United States rated just above average, with food provision, tourism and recreation identified as leading concerns. The report, published in the journal Nature, gave each nation a score between 0-100 in ten separate categories like clean water, biodiversity, food provision, carbon storage, coastal...

Spawning Of Threatened Pillar Coral Observed For First Time In Florida Reef System
2012-08-09 11:25:00

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Male and female threatened pillar coral have been documented for the first time spawning together in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, said researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The researchers were exhilarated by the displays of male and female pillar coral releasing their reproductive cells during a spawning session in the Upper Keys on Saturday, just after the full moon. At precisely...

2012-08-02 16:45:33

Widespread skin cancer has been identified for the first time in wild marine fish populations, new research has shown. A collaborative study between Newcastle University, UK, and the Australian Institute of Marine Science published today in the academic journal PLoS ONE - reveals the incidence of melanoma in the coral trout, a species found on the Great Barrier Reef and directly beneath the world's largest hole in the ozone layer. This is the first time skin cancer has been diagnosed in...

Reign Of Acid Rain Is Far From Over
2012-07-26 05:46:01

New connection between climate change and acidification of Northeast's forests and streams Acid rain. It was a problem that largely affected U.S. eastern states. It began in the 1950s when Midwest coal plants spewed sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides into the air, turning clouds--and rainfall--acidic. As acid rain fell, it affected everything it touched, leaching calcium from soils and robbing plants of important nutrients. New England's sugar maples were among the trees left high and...

Hatches Close On Aquarius Lab, Possibly For The Last Time
2012-07-23 14:13:19

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Aquanauts could now officially be a thing of the past, as Sunday saw the doors of the undersea research lab Aquarius Reef Base close for the last time. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) lab was established in 1986, and operated around the U.S. Virgin Islands for over two decades at 60 feet below the surface of the ocean. Federal budget cuts have left the Aquarius lab without its $3 million annual funding,...

Mass Extinction Of Species Could Prove Harmful To Humans
2012-06-20 11:29:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Plants and animals, both wild and domestic, are inextricably linked and any mass extinction of species would be catastrophic for life around the world, including humans. That´s the underlying theme in the newest update to the Red List of Threatened Species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) released Tuesday at the Rio+20 conference. The report showed that “of the 63,837 species assessed, 19,817 are threatened with...

2012-06-01 10:10:12

Major new marine herbivory study Coral reefs and seashores largely look the way they do because large fish and urchins eat most of the seaweed that might otherwise cover them, but a major new study has found that the greatest impact of all comes from an unexpected quarter — small marine snails. The study published in the journal Ecology Letters is the largest of its kind ever undertaken into the ecological impacts of marine grazing animals: it was led by Associate Professor...


Latest Coral reef Reference Libraries

Black Sea Urchin, Diadema antillarum
2013-11-06 11:22:21

Diadema antillarum, known also as the Lime Urchin, the Long-Spined Sea Urchin, or the Black Sea Urchin, is a species of sea urchin belonging to the family Diadematidae. It is characterized by its extremely long black spines. This species is the most plentiful and significant herbivore on the coral reefs of the western Atlantic and Caribbean basin. Then the population of these sea urchins is at a healthy level, they’re the main grazers which prevent algae overgrowth of the reef....

Synaptula lamperti
2013-11-04 09:27:28

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber belonging to the family Synaptidae within the phylum Echinodermata, located on coral reefs within the Indo-Pacific region. The echinoderms are marine invertebrates and they include the sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and starfish. They’re radially symmetric and have a water vascular system that is driven by hydrostatic pressure, making them able to move around via numerous suckers known as tube feet. Sea cucumbers are typically leathery,...

Diadema setosum
2013-04-30 15:23:43

Diadema setosum is a species of sea urchin that can be found in Indo-Pacific waters. Its range extends from the Red Sea to coasts of Australia in the east, and from Japan in the north to the east coast of Africa in the south. There have been a few individuals found outside of this natural range, leading experts to believe that it was introduced by natural or manmade causes. Two individuals were found off the coast of the Kaş peninsula in Turkey in 2006. These individuals represent the first...

Lampert's Sea Cucumber, Synaptula lamperti
2013-04-30 15:18:06

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber that can be found in the waters of the Indo-Pacific. Its range includes the coastal waters of Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Micronesia. It does not have the tube feet, which are common to other species of sea cucumber, instead moving around by using a small grouping of pinnate feeding tentacles, which are always moving. It can also move by using the small, hook-like bones found along its body, attaching itself to the sea...

Black Sea Urchin, Diadema antillarum
2013-04-30 12:59:49

The black sea urchin (Diadema antillarum), also known as the lime sea urchin or the long-spined sea urchin, is a species that can be found in the Caribbean basin and the western waters of the Atlantic Ocean. It prefers to inhabit coral reefs in these areas and resides at depths of up to 32.8 feet. This species has a test, or outer shell, that is similar that of most species of sea urchin. However, this species has longer spines, a trait from which it derived one of its common names. These...

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Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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