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Latest Coral reef Stories

Evidence In Bahamas And Bermuda Suggests Increased Rise In Sea Levels
2012-03-15 11:45:55

Scientists are now predicting sea levels will climb another several inches -- or even a few feet -- by the year 2100, according to recent studies. Studying cliffs and ancient reefs on the sub-tropical islands of the Bahamas and Bermuda, scientists are investigating global sea rise and comparing these results against data from more than a century ago. The Bahamas and Bermuda have been attracting fossil hunters for many years. The land on the Bahamas, for example, is built on a foundation...

Sharks More Prevalent In Protected Areas, Study Claims
2012-03-10 06:22:33

Using data collected from over 200 baited remote underwater video (BRUV) cameras, scientists have discovered that Caribbean reef sharks are more abundant in marine reserves than in areas where fishing is allowed. The BRUV cameras, affectionately dubbed "chum cams," were placed both inside and outside aquatic reserve areas on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef in the Caribbean Sea by researchers from the Stony Brook University Institute for Ocean Conservation Science. Their goal was to test a...

Future Of Energy Source Is Seaweed, Researchers Say
2012-03-05 13:30:46

Researchers are looking to the sea in their search for safer and cleaner future alternative energy sources. The team from various institutions and organizations is developing methods for growing and harvesting seaweed as a source of renewable energy. Professor Avigdor Abelson of Tel Aviv University's Department of Zoology believes that not only can the macroalgae be grown unobtrusively along coastlines, they can also help clear the water of excessive nutrients. Pollution caused by...

Ocean Acidification Rapid Compared To Ancient Times
2012-03-02 13:49:09

The world´s oceans may be acidifying more rapidly than they have at any time in the past 300 million years due to high levels of pollution, according to research published this week in the journal Science. Researchers, led by Columbia University´s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the University of Bristol, assessed a number of climate change events in Earth´s history, including an asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. They warn that too...

2012-02-23 08:00:00

New Soil Reef biochar is the last soil amendment gardeners will ever need. Whether a gardening enthusiast, landscaper, grower or forester; Soil Reef biochar provides massive gains in both agriculture and the environment. Berwyn, PA (PRWEB) February 23, 2012 One part rich, black soil plus one part "Legend of El Dorado," makes Soil Reef biochar the ancient solution to our modern soil problem. In 1541, Spanish conquistador Francisco de Orellana, led a famous expedition of the Amazon. He...

2012-02-21 23:14:33

One of the greatest biological threats to tropical coral reefs can be a population outbreak of crown-of-thorns (COT) sea stars (Acanthaster planci). Outbreaks can consume live corals over large areas, a change that can promote algal growth, alter reef fish populations, and reduce the aesthetic value of coral reefs, which in turn negatively affects tourism. Despite more than 30 years of research, the triggers and spread of COT outbreaks are not fully understood. Human impacts such as...

2012-02-10 10:23:01

Half of fishermen would not give up their livelihood in the face of drastically declining catches according to research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA). A new report, published today by PLoS ONE, challenges previously held notions about poverty and adaptation by investigating why fishermen in developing countries stick with their trade. Lead author Dr Tim Daw from UEA's School of International Development and the Stockholm Resilience Centre said: "We found that half of...

Image 1 - Ocean Acidification Study Helps Scientists Evaluate Effects On Marine Life
2012-01-24 04:05:48

Might a penguin's next meal be affected by the exhaust from your tailpipe? The answer may be yes, when you add your exhaust fumes to the total amount of carbon dioxide lofted into the atmosphere by humans since the industrial revolution. One-third of that carbon dioxide is absorbed by the world's oceans, making them more acidic and affecting marine life. A UC Santa Barbara marine scientist and a team of 18 other researchers have reported results of the broadest worldwide study of ocean...

2012-01-23 10:50:58

Nearly one-third of CO2 emissions due to human activities enters the world's oceans. By reacting with seawater, CO2 increases the water's acidity, which may significantly reduce the calcification rate of such marine organisms as corals and mollusks. The extent to which human activities have raised the surface level of acidity, however, has been difficult to detect on regional scales because it varies naturally from one season and one year to the next, and between regions, and direct...


Latest Coral reef Reference Libraries

Black Sea Urchin, Diadema antillarum
2013-11-06 11:22:21

Diadema antillarum, known also as the Lime Urchin, the Long-Spined Sea Urchin, or the Black Sea Urchin, is a species of sea urchin belonging to the family Diadematidae. It is characterized by its extremely long black spines. This species is the most plentiful and significant herbivore on the coral reefs of the western Atlantic and Caribbean basin. Then the population of these sea urchins is at a healthy level, they’re the main grazers which prevent algae overgrowth of the reef....

Synaptula lamperti
2013-11-04 09:27:28

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber belonging to the family Synaptidae within the phylum Echinodermata, located on coral reefs within the Indo-Pacific region. The echinoderms are marine invertebrates and they include the sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and starfish. They’re radially symmetric and have a water vascular system that is driven by hydrostatic pressure, making them able to move around via numerous suckers known as tube feet. Sea cucumbers are typically leathery,...

Diadema setosum
2013-04-30 15:23:43

Diadema setosum is a species of sea urchin that can be found in Indo-Pacific waters. Its range extends from the Red Sea to coasts of Australia in the east, and from Japan in the north to the east coast of Africa in the south. There have been a few individuals found outside of this natural range, leading experts to believe that it was introduced by natural or manmade causes. Two individuals were found off the coast of the Kaş peninsula in Turkey in 2006. These individuals represent the first...

Lampert's Sea Cucumber, Synaptula lamperti
2013-04-30 15:18:06

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber that can be found in the waters of the Indo-Pacific. Its range includes the coastal waters of Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Micronesia. It does not have the tube feet, which are common to other species of sea cucumber, instead moving around by using a small grouping of pinnate feeding tentacles, which are always moving. It can also move by using the small, hook-like bones found along its body, attaching itself to the sea...

Black Sea Urchin, Diadema antillarum
2013-04-30 12:59:49

The black sea urchin (Diadema antillarum), also known as the lime sea urchin or the long-spined sea urchin, is a species that can be found in the Caribbean basin and the western waters of the Atlantic Ocean. It prefers to inhabit coral reefs in these areas and resides at depths of up to 32.8 feet. This species has a test, or outer shell, that is similar that of most species of sea urchin. However, this species has longer spines, a trait from which it derived one of its common names. These...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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