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Latest Coral Stories

Charles Darwin Was Right - Some Species Can't Make The Trip
2012-08-28 11:07:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In 1880 Charles Darwin hypothesized that most species could not disperse across the Eastern Pacific Barrier (EPB). A new study, led by Iliana Baums, assistant professor of biology at Penn State University, is the first comprehensive test of that hypothesis using coral. The study, to be published in Molecular Ecology, found that a coral species in abundance from Indonesia eastward to Fiji, Samoa and the Line Islands rarely crosses the...

2012-08-25 23:02:22

Coral Springs, FL, home to the Today in America TV studios, makes Best Places to Live list. Coral Springs, FL (PRWEB) August 25, 2012 People often think of South Florida as haven for retirees. Rarely do they see the cities and communities where families flourish and children attend schools of excellence. Today in America TV is proud to announce that Coral Springs, Florida, where the studios are located, made one of the prestigious “Best Places to Live” lists. CNN Money Magazine...

Improving Water Quality May Help Save Coral Reefs
2012-08-20 16:58:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online It has been found that an unevenness of nutrients in reef waters can increase the bleaching vulnerability of reef corals according to Research from the University of Southampton and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. Numerous polyps jointly forming a layer of living tissue that cover the calcareous skeletons make up the corals. Single-celled algae called zooxanthellae, which live within the coral polyps, is what they...

Atlantic Ocean Gets Hit With Invasive Brittle Star Species
2012-08-20 12:37:24

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The appearance and ecology of Atlantic coral reef habitats could be altered by yellow brittle star A study co-written by Dr. Gordon Hendler of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) about an invasive species of brittle star, Ophiothela mirabilis, has been published online in Coral Reefs, the Journal of the International Society for Reef Studies. Growing populations have established themselves at distant points in...

2012-08-16 23:04:14

Inspired by a recent study showing that overconfidence is a beneficial trait for social and work interactions, Coral Calcium Shop releases benefits of Coral Calcium & Hyaluronic Acid to physical well-being. (PRWEB) August 16, 2012 According to a new study recently recorded in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, “overconfidence” actually helps people to climb the social ladder, often leading to promotions which may be beyond their competency levels. Medical News...

Spawning Of Threatened Pillar Coral Observed For First Time In Florida Reef System
2012-08-09 11:25:00

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Male and female threatened pillar coral have been documented for the first time spawning together in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, said researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The researchers were exhilarated by the displays of male and female pillar coral releasing their reproductive cells during a spawning session in the Upper Keys on Saturday, just after the full moon. At precisely...

Additions To Coral Reef Woes Are Microbes, Sponges And Worms
2012-08-07 13:46:12

Study by Wildlife Conservation Society and University of the Azores identifies additional risks to reefs stemming from pollution and heavy fishing Microbes, sponges, and worms–the side effects of pollution and heavy fishing–are adding insult to injury in Kenya's imperiled reef systems, according to a recent study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the University of Azores. The authors of the study have found that pollution and overfishing on reef systems have an...

Thriving Coral Reef In Muddy Waters
2012-08-04 13:43:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The Middle Reef, part of Australia´s Great Barrier Reef, is growing more quickly than reefs in other areas with lower levels of sediment stress, a new study has found. Rapid coral reef growth has been identified in environments with large amounts of sediment, conditions previously thought to be detrimental to reef growth. The study, led by the University of Exeter with an international team of scientists, is published today...

2012-08-02 16:45:33

Widespread skin cancer has been identified for the first time in wild marine fish populations, new research has shown. A collaborative study between Newcastle University, UK, and the Australian Institute of Marine Science published today in the academic journal PLoS ONE - reveals the incidence of melanoma in the coral trout, a species found on the Great Barrier Reef and directly beneath the world's largest hole in the ozone layer. This is the first time skin cancer has been diagnosed in...

2012-08-02 07:04:48

Fish With Skin Cancer? By: Erika Dunayer, Ivanhoe Health Correspondent (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and is the leading cause of death from skin disease. Over 9,000 people die from Melanoma every year in the United States. Researchers are now starting to see evidence of the disease in fish! A collaborative study between Newcastle University, UK, and the Australian Institute of Marine Science reveals the incidence of melanoma in the coral...


Latest Coral Reference Libraries

Crown Of Thorns Starfish, Acanthaster planci
2013-11-11 10:54:41

The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that extends from the Red Sea to the African coasts in the east and from the Indian Ocean to the western coasts of Central America. It prefers a habitat in coral reefs, which can be harmed if population numbers are too high. Damage occurs when filamentous algae covers bare skeletons of coral and the starfish move in to feed, stripping...

Coral Reef
2013-04-20 15:49:21

Coral reefs are submerged structures consisting of calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of small animals found in marine waters that enclose few nutrients. The majority of coral reefs are constructed from stony corals, which then consist of polyps that come together in groups. The polyps are like small sea anemones, to which they are very closely related. Unlike the sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which provide support and protections...

Foxface Rabbitfish, Siganus vulpinus
2013-02-17 07:58:30

Image Credit: Dr. Wayne Meadows (NOAA)/Wikipedia The foxface rabbitfish is found in coral rich lagoons, and reefs in the coastal water of the Western Pacific. Around the western Philippines, Indonesia, New Guinea, the Great Barrier Reef, New Caledonia, Caroline Islands, and the Marshall Islands. It has also been sighted around Vanuatu, Nauru, Kiribati, and recently Tonga. Adults usually swim in pairs, but the juveniles have been known to form schools. The adult foxface rabbitfish is...

Barrier Reef Anemonefish, Amphiprion akindynos
2012-05-11 12:04:43

The Barrier Reef Anemonefish (Amphiprion akindynos) is native to the marine lagoons and reefs in the Western Pacific Ocean.  It lives at a depth of around eighty-two feet in temperatures fluctuating between fifty degrees Fahrenheit to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Its range includes northern New South Wales, the Loyalty Islands, Tonga, New Caledonia, Coral Sea, and the Great Barrier Reef. They are typically seen near or within the tentacles of their host anemones. They will inhabit anemones like...

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
2012-04-03 20:41:16

Knotted Fan Coral, (Melithaea ochracea), is a species of colonial soft coral that is found in tree-like fans on shallow reefs in the South China Sea between Taiwan and Indonesia, including Singapore and Malaysia. In Taiwan, it is the most widespread coral in its family Gorgonacea. It is found on the higher parts of reef fronts where its numerous small polyps can feed at water flow rates varying from 1.6 to 16 inches per second. This species usually grow to about 8 inches in length, with...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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