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Latest Coral Stories

2012-05-31 01:12:17

An international team of scientists has gathered the first conclusive evidence that marine reserves can help restock exploited fish populations on neighboring reefs which are open to both commercial and recreational fishing. The groundbreaking study was carried out in the Keppel Island group on Australia´s Great Barrier Reef by researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS), in conjunction with other leading research institutions, and is reported in the...

2012-05-28 23:03:27

Aquarius LED Grow Lights from Hydro Grow offer a modern solution to HID lights for coral grown indoors in a tank environment. (PRWEB) May 27, 2012 Whether in an upscale plastic surgery office in Beverly Hills or a Veterinarian´s office in the country, you´ve likely seen beautiful coral growing in an elaborate tank with colorful fish and little creatures scurrying about the sand floor. As a child my sister and I would glue our faces against the glass when seeing such a site, but...

2012-05-08 10:50:05

Jobs, livelihoods and ecotourism industries can benefit from having a diverse supply of weed-eating fish on the world´s coral reefs, marine researchers say. Despite their small size, relative to the sharks, whales, and turtles that often get more attention, herbivorous fish play a vital role in maintaining the health of coral reefs, which support the livelihoods of 500 million people worldwide, say researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook...

2012-05-03 09:11:50

Australia´s sea snakes may be more in danger of extinction than previously thought, marine scientists say. New research on turtleheaded sea snakes that frequent coral reefs in Australia and nearby New Caledonia has found they are strongly attached to their home reef and rarely venture even a few kilometers to neighboring reefs. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) and The University of Sydney used genetic ℠fingerprinting´ to show...

Isolated Pacific Could Become Safe Haven In A Warming World
2012-05-01 04:26:11

Jason Farmer for RedOrbit.com Based on current models of climate change, scientists predict that ocean temperatures will continue to rise in the equatorial Pacific, potentially devastating coral reef ecosystems. However, a recent study by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientists Kristopher Karnauskas and Anne Cohen suggests that climate change may also cause ocean currents to operate in ways that could attenuate the warming near a number of islands located right on the equator....

2012-04-12 21:05:44

As ocean temperatures rise, some species of corals are likely to succeed at the expense of others, according to a report published online on April 12 in the Cell Press journal Current Biology that details the first large-scale investigation of climate effects on corals. "The good news is that, rather than experiencing wholesale destruction, many coral reefs will survive climate change by changing the mix of coral species as the ocean warms and becomes more acidic," said Terry Hughes of...

Study Shows Adaptive Capacity Of Reef Corals To Climate Change May Be Widespread
2012-04-12 07:42:53

Global survey of corals using high sensitivity genetic analysis shows many species can host multiple symbionts. A new study by scientists at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science suggests that many species of reef-building corals may be able to adapt to warming waters by relying on their closest aquatic partners - algae. The corals' ability to host a variety of algal types, each with different sensitivities to environmental stress, could offer a...

Ice Sheet Collapse And Sea-level Rise At The Bølling Warming 14,600 Years Ago
2012-04-06 04:23:00

International scientists have shown that a dramatic sea-level rise occurred at the onset of the first warm period of the last deglaciation, known as the Bølling warming, approximately 14,600 years ago. This event, referred to as Melt-Water Pulse 1A (MWP-1A), corresponds to a rapid collapse of massive ice sheets 14,600 years ago and resulted in global sea-level rise of ~14 m. These findings are published in the 29 March 2012 issue of the journal Nature (Volume 483, Issue 7391)....


Latest Coral Reference Libraries

Crown Of Thorns Starfish, Acanthaster planci
2013-11-11 10:54:41

The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that extends from the Red Sea to the African coasts in the east and from the Indian Ocean to the western coasts of Central America. It prefers a habitat in coral reefs, which can be harmed if population numbers are too high. Damage occurs when filamentous algae covers bare skeletons of coral and the starfish move in to feed, stripping...

Coral Reef
2013-04-20 15:49:21

Coral reefs are submerged structures consisting of calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of small animals found in marine waters that enclose few nutrients. The majority of coral reefs are constructed from stony corals, which then consist of polyps that come together in groups. The polyps are like small sea anemones, to which they are very closely related. Unlike the sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which provide support and protections...

Foxface Rabbitfish, Siganus vulpinus
2013-02-17 07:58:30

Image Credit: Dr. Wayne Meadows (NOAA)/Wikipedia The foxface rabbitfish is found in coral rich lagoons, and reefs in the coastal water of the Western Pacific. Around the western Philippines, Indonesia, New Guinea, the Great Barrier Reef, New Caledonia, Caroline Islands, and the Marshall Islands. It has also been sighted around Vanuatu, Nauru, Kiribati, and recently Tonga. Adults usually swim in pairs, but the juveniles have been known to form schools. The adult foxface rabbitfish is...

Barrier Reef Anemonefish, Amphiprion akindynos
2012-05-11 12:04:43

The Barrier Reef Anemonefish (Amphiprion akindynos) is native to the marine lagoons and reefs in the Western Pacific Ocean.  It lives at a depth of around eighty-two feet in temperatures fluctuating between fifty degrees Fahrenheit to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Its range includes northern New South Wales, the Loyalty Islands, Tonga, New Caledonia, Coral Sea, and the Great Barrier Reef. They are typically seen near or within the tentacles of their host anemones. They will inhabit anemones like...

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
2012-04-03 20:41:16

Knotted Fan Coral, (Melithaea ochracea), is a species of colonial soft coral that is found in tree-like fans on shallow reefs in the South China Sea between Taiwan and Indonesia, including Singapore and Malaysia. In Taiwan, it is the most widespread coral in its family Gorgonacea. It is found on the higher parts of reef fronts where its numerous small polyps can feed at water flow rates varying from 1.6 to 16 inches per second. This species usually grow to about 8 inches in length, with...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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