Quantcast

Latest Coral Stories

hard coral species Pachyseris inattesa
2014-08-19 03:30:07

Pensoft Publishers The hard corals primarily responsible for the construction of coral reefs around the world have attracted the attention of taxonomists for hundreds of years. Despite the important role such corals play in building what are arguably the world's most diverse ecosystems, coral reefs in some parts of the world still hold surprises for modern scientists. An international team of scientists has recently described a new hard coral species, Pachyseris inattesa, from the Saudi...

2014-08-05 16:22:29

Making Marine Protected Areas a Global Agenda Item LANDOVER, Md., Aug. 5, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Lewis Pugh announced this morning the Seven Swims in The Seven Seas for 1 Reason expedition: a long distance swim in each of the Seven Seas (the Mediterranean, Adriatic, Aegean, Black, Red, Arabian and North Sea). Already the first person to complete a long distance swim in every ocean of the world, he will be the first person to undertake a long distance swim in each of the...

bumphead parrotfish
2014-07-31 03:30:55

Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara In the high-tech world of science, researchers sometimes need to get back to basics. UC Santa Barbara’s Douglas McCauley did just that to study the impacts of the bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) on coral reef ecosystems at two remote locations in the central Pacific Ocean. Using direct observation, animal tracking and computer simulation, McCauley, an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, and his...

ocean acidification risk index
2014-07-31 02:00:58

NOAA Ocean acidification is driving changes in waters vital to Alaska’s valuable commercial fisheries and subsistence way of life, according to new NOAA-led research that will be published online in Progress in Oceanography. Many of Alaska’s nutritionally and economically valuable marine fisheries are located in waters that are already experiencing ocean acidification, and will see more in the near future, the study shows. Communities in southeast and southwest Alaska face the...

deepwater horizon coral
2014-07-30 04:28:49

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The environmental impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is more widespread than previously believed, as experts have located two additional deep-water coral communities that were damaged by the 2010 disaster. The discovery was made by a team of researchers led by Penn State University biology professor Charles Fisher, and is detailed in a paper published online Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences....

2014-07-29 23:03:53

Corals that build reefs have few defenses against rising ocean temperatures and other effects of global climate change. The authors of an article published in the current issue of Phycologia seek to recognize a coral species group that appears to have adapted to withstand the physiological stress of ocean temperature changes. Lawrence, KS (PRWEB) July 29, 2014 Phycologia – Corals that build reefs have few defenses against rising ocean temperatures and other effects of global climate...

It's All About Being Fat And Flexible For Corals Adapting To Climate Change
2014-07-10 03:47:46

By Pam Frost Gorder, Ohio State University Study suggests best targets for environmental conservation The future health of the world's coral reefs and the animals that depend on them relies in part on the ability of one tiny symbiotic sea creature to get fat—and to be flexible about the type of algae it cooperates with. In the first study of its kind, scientists at The Ohio State University discovered that corals—tiny reef-forming animals that live symbiotically with algae—are...

eyestripe surgeonfish
2014-07-09 03:30:10

University of New South Wales The migration of tropical fish as a result of ocean warming poses a serious threat to the temperate areas they invade, because they overgraze on kelp forests and seagrass meadows, a new study concludes. The harmful impact of tropical fish is most evident in southern Japanese waters and the eastern Mediterranean, where there have been dramatic declines in kelps. There is also emerging evidence in Australia and the US that the spread of tropical fish...

Researchers Study Biological Erosion Of Mesophotic Tropical Coral Reefs
2014-07-09 03:10:42

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science Researchers compare bioerosion on deeper reef systems to better understand long-term structural sustainability A new study on biological erosion of mesophotic tropical coral reefs, which are low energy reef environments between 30-150 meters deep, provides new insights into processes that affect the overall structure of these important ecosystems. The purpose of the study was to better understand how bioerosion...

How Does Algal And Coral Cover Affect Microscopic Life That Call The Reef Home?
2014-07-07 03:56:00

By Michael Price, San Diego State University A new study by biologists at San Diego State University and Scripps Institution of Oceanography shows that inhabited coral islands that engage in commercial fishing dramatically alter their nearby reef ecosystems, disturbing the microbes, corals, algae and fish that call the reef home. The study’s lead author, Linda Wegley Kelly, is a postdoctoral scholar in the lab of SDSU virologist Forest Rohwer. She's been involved in some capacity...


Latest Coral Reference Libraries

Crown Of Thorns Starfish, Acanthaster planci
2013-11-11 10:54:41

The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that extends from the Red Sea to the African coasts in the east and from the Indian Ocean to the western coasts of Central America. It prefers a habitat in coral reefs, which can be harmed if population numbers are too high. Damage occurs when filamentous algae covers bare skeletons of coral and the starfish move in to feed, stripping...

Coral Reef
2013-04-20 15:49:21

Coral reefs are submerged structures consisting of calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of small animals found in marine waters that enclose few nutrients. The majority of coral reefs are constructed from stony corals, which then consist of polyps that come together in groups. The polyps are like small sea anemones, to which they are very closely related. Unlike the sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which provide support and protections...

Foxface Rabbitfish, Siganus vulpinus
2013-02-17 07:58:30

Image Credit: Dr. Wayne Meadows (NOAA)/Wikipedia The foxface rabbitfish is found in coral rich lagoons, and reefs in the coastal water of the Western Pacific. Around the western Philippines, Indonesia, New Guinea, the Great Barrier Reef, New Caledonia, Caroline Islands, and the Marshall Islands. It has also been sighted around Vanuatu, Nauru, Kiribati, and recently Tonga. Adults usually swim in pairs, but the juveniles have been known to form schools. The adult foxface rabbitfish is...

Barrier Reef Anemonefish, Amphiprion akindynos
2012-05-11 12:04:43

The Barrier Reef Anemonefish (Amphiprion akindynos) is native to the marine lagoons and reefs in the Western Pacific Ocean.  It lives at a depth of around eighty-two feet in temperatures fluctuating between fifty degrees Fahrenheit to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Its range includes northern New South Wales, the Loyalty Islands, Tonga, New Caledonia, Coral Sea, and the Great Barrier Reef. They are typically seen near or within the tentacles of their host anemones. They will inhabit anemones like...

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
2012-04-03 20:41:16

Knotted Fan Coral, (Melithaea ochracea), is a species of colonial soft coral that is found in tree-like fans on shallow reefs in the South China Sea between Taiwan and Indonesia, including Singapore and Malaysia. In Taiwan, it is the most widespread coral in its family Gorgonacea. It is found on the higher parts of reef fronts where its numerous small polyps can feed at water flow rates varying from 1.6 to 16 inches per second. This species usually grow to about 8 inches in length, with...

More Articles (30 articles) »
Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
Related