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Latest Core–mantle boundary Stories

Roots Of Catastrophe Run Deep
2013-02-07 11:20:32

University of Utah Partly molten, Florida-sized blob forms atop Earth's core A University of Utah seismologist analyzed seismic waves that bombarded Earth's core, and believes he got a look at the earliest roots of Earth's most cataclysmic kind of volcanic eruption. But don't worry. He says it won't happen for perhaps 200 million years. "What we may be detecting is the start of one of these large eruptive events that — if it ever happens — could cause very massive...

Volcanic Hotspot Origins Revealed Through X-ray Analysis
2012-07-19 07:26:46

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Most volcanoes are situated where continental plates shift against each other. This is where the continental crust is weakened, allowing magma to break through to the surface. The Pacific "Ring of Fire" exhibits this kind of plate movement, resulting in powerful earthquakes and multiple active volcanoes. Volcanic hotspots, however, are of a completely different nature because most of them are far away from plate boundaries. The...

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2011-05-20 12:25:00

The inner core of the Earth is simultaneously melting and freezing due to circulation of heat in the overlying rocky mantle, according to new research from the University of Leeds, UC San Diego and the Indian Institute of Technology.The findings, published tomorrow in Nature, could help us understand how the inner core formed and how the outer core acts as a 'geodynamo', which generates the planet's magnetic field."The origins of Earth's magnetic field remain a mystery to scientists," said...

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2010-09-25 06:40:00

Scientists have wondered for some time why certain seismic waves travel more quickly through the core-mantle boundary, a thin layer of the Earth's interior that lies between about 1675 and 1800 miles below the surface. Now a new study by Yale University and the University of California, Berkeley sheds light on the mystery by showing how this region behaves under the extreme conditions found so deep in the Earth. The findings, which appeared in the Sept. 24 issue of the journal Science, have...

2010-09-02 11:24:30

Using a diamond-anvil cell to recreate the high pressures deep within the earth, researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have found unusual properties in an iron-rich magnesium- and iron-oxide mineral that may explain the existence of several ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) at the core"“mantle boundary. A paper about their findings was published in a recent issue of Geophysical Research Letters (GRL). ULVZs"”which were first discovered in the early 1990s...

2010-07-15 02:57:06

UH geologist says future searchers should focus on particular areas While prospectors and geologists have been successful in finding diamonds through diligent searching, one University of Houston professor and his team's work could help improve the odds by focusing future searches in particular areas. Kevin Burke, professor of geology and tectonics at UH, and his fellow researchers describe these findings in a paper titled "Diamonds Sampled by Plumes from the Core-Mantle Boundary," appearing...

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2009-06-15 14:40:00

UC Davis team calculates distribution of iron isotopes in Earth's mantle 4.5 billion years ago, opening door to new studies of planet's geologic historyBy using a super-computer to virtually squeeze and heat iron-bearing minerals under conditions that would have existed when the Earth crystallized from an ocean of magma to its solid form 4.5 billion years ago, two UC Davis geochemists have produced the first picture of how different isotopes of iron were initially distributed in the solid...

2005-06-01 15:11:04

TEMPE, Ariz. - Deep within Earth, researchers are finding hints of exotic materials and behaviors unrivaled anywhere else on the planet. Now a team of researchers is making connections between the dynamic activities deep inside Earth and geologic features at its surface. The researchers, which include two seismologists from Arizona State University, have detected a relatively small and isolated patch of exotic material, called an ultra low velocity zone (ULVZ), that may in fact be a "root"...