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Latest Coronary artery bypass surgery Stories

2011-10-03 12:22:44

Small bypass vessels which act as a 'back-up system' for the heart's main arteries play a significant role in reducing the mortality of patients with coronary artery disease, according to new research. Researchers from UCL, University of Bern, Yale University and other international collaborators examined the role of natural bypass vessels called coronary collaterals in patients with blocked arteries. The study, published online today in the European Heart Journal, shows that patients...

2011-09-28 14:13:37

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the first genetic variant associated with severity of coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Though this variant is not likely the cause of more severe coronary disease, the researchers say, it implicates a gene that could be. Such a gene has promise as a future target for treating coronary artery disease in diabetic patients. “There is a knowledge gap in our understanding of...

2011-09-27 17:48:18

Surgeons from Boston Medical Center (BMC) have found that in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, aggressive glycemic control does not result in any significant improvement of clinical outcomes as compared with moderate control. The findings, which appear in this month's issue of Annals of Surgery, also found the incidence of hypoglycemic events increased with aggressive glycemic control. Currently, 40 percent of all patients undergoing CABG suffer from...

2011-09-27 12:10:31

Plaque disruption is origin of less common type of myocardial infarction in women without significant obstructive coronary artery disease Researchers at the Cardiac & Vascular Institute at NYU Langone Medical Center have identified a hidden culprit in the battle against women's heart disease. Plaque disruption, a rupture or ulceration of cholesterol plaque in a coronary artery, has been discovered as the mechanism behind myocardial infarction (heart attack) in some women without...

2011-09-27 05:42:03

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Could your genes prevent coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart attack? Scientists are saying yes. About 13 million people in the United States have coronary artery disease. It is the number one killer of both men and women. Now, an international consortium of scientists are reporting the discovery of five new genes that affect the risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart attacks. According to the study the identification of the roles of...

2011-09-22 07:00:00

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Sept. 22, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cardica, Inc. (Nasdaq: CRDC) today announced that it has achieved the first MicroCutter(TM) milestone under its distribution agreement and loan commitment with Century Medical, allowing Cardica to draw the first $2 million of an up to $4 million loan commitment from Century. "We are pleased to have achieved this milestone within two weeks after signing the original agreement, bringing us access to additional capital as we continue to...

2011-09-13 12:07:43

Duke University Medical Center researchers have found a genetic variant that seems to be associated with lower five-year survival after a coronary artery bypass. The scientists found the same gene was associated with mortality in two different sets of patients, with about 1,000 patients in each group (1,018 and 930 patients, respectively). "After the second analysis, we were ecstatic to see this was validated," said senior author Mihai Podgoreanu, assistant professor of anesthesiology...

2011-09-09 07:00:00

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Sept. 9, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cardica, Inc. (Nasdaq: CRDC) today reported that its C-Port® Flex-A® Anastomosis System will be featured in a clinical presentation to cardiothoracic surgeons this afternoon at the East Carolina Heart Institute-International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiothoracic Surgery (ECHI-ISMICS) Summit in Greenville, North Carolina. The presentation, entitled "Robotic Coronary Revascularization:...

2011-08-29 20:15:09

Observations from the CREDO-Kyoto PCI/CABG registry Cohort-2 Results from CREDO-Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2 show that percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was associated with significantly higher risk for serious adverse events in patients with triple vessel disease than coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The protective effect of CABG for myocardial infarction was described as "especially remarkable". In view of these results, said investigator Dr Hiroki Shiomi from Kyoto...

2011-08-29 12:59:19

Reconnecting severed blood vessels is mostly done the same way today – with sutures – as it was 100 years ago, when the French surgeon Alexis Carrel won a Nobel Prize for advancing the technique. Now, a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has developed a sutureless method that appears to be a faster, safer and easier alternative. In animal studies, a team led by Stanford microsurgeon Geoffrey Gurtner, MD, used a poloxamer gel and bioadhesive rather...