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Latest Corvidae Stories

magpie cleared of all charges
2014-08-18 07:02:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Despite its reputation in literature and folklore, researchers from the University of Exeter Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour (CRAB) have found no evidence that magpies are attracted to shiny objects. In fact, not only do the long-tailed members of the crow family not compulsively swipe jewelry and other small trinkets, but they are actually frightened of new objects instead of being attracted to them, according to research...

Are New Caledonian Crows Smarter Than A First-Grader?
2014-07-28 03:42:16

By Andrea Estrada, UC Santa Barbara UCSB researcher shows that New Caledonian crows can perform as well as 7- to 10-year-olds on cause-and-effect water displacement tasks In Aesop’s fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird happens upon a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds the water level out of his reach. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it — one at a time — until the water level rises enough for him...

2014-03-26 11:06:47

Knowing what another person wants is not a trivial issue, particularly when the other's desires are different from our own. The ability to disengage from our own desire to cater to someone else's wishes is thought to be a unique feature of human cognition. New research challenges this assumption. Despite wanting something different to eat, male Eurasian jays can disengage from their own current desire in order to feed the female what she wants even when her desires are different to his....

Do Birds Communicate With Their Eyes?
2014-02-05 12:41:12

University of Cambridge Researchers in Cambridge and Exeter have discovered that jackdaws use their eyes to communicate with each other – the first time this has been shown in non-primates. While what humans do with their eyes has been well studied, we know almost nothing about whether birds communicate with members of the same species with their eyes. The new study, published today in Biology Letters, shows that jackdaw eyes are used as a warning signal to successfully deter...

2013-05-17 23:16:19

Mary Simmons, geologist, takes a stand for nature in new book Denver (PRWEB) May 17, 2013 Looking at something from a different angle often paints a more accurate picture. Mary Simmons uses both sides of her brain: she has a Masters of Science degree in geology and she enjoys painting, pottery and making jewelry, often using natural materials from the local landscape. Her expertise on the environment and all of its inhabitants led Simmons to write “Corvus Rising,” a fantasy...

Eurasian Jays Keep Quiet To Protect Stored Food
2012-12-05 13:05:55

University of Cambridge [ Watch The Video ] Eurasian jays change strategies to prevent others from stealing food and to improve their chances of absconding with other birds' caches In order to prevent other birds from stealing the food they are storing for later, Eurasian jays, a type of corvid, minimizes any auditory hints a potential pilferer may use to steal their cache (food that is buried for later use). The new research was published today, 05 December, in the journal...

Mourning Their Losses - Scrub Jays Hold Funerals For Fallen Comrades
2012-09-12 10:10:24

Watch the Video: Western Scrub Jay Funeral Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mourning is not just a trait shared by humans, but scientists say it is also shared by the Western scrub jays. Researchers say the Western scrub jays summon others over to the body of a dead jay to screech over their dead brethren. University of California, Davis researchers said that the birds' cacophonous "funerals" can easily last up to half an hour. Previous reports show that...

Ravens Use Gestures To Signal Potential Partners
2011-11-30 06:37:06

Ravens use their beaks and wings to point and hold up objects in order to attract attention, much like humans use our hands to make gestures, according to a new study by German and Austrian experts. The study is the first time researchers have observed such gestures in the wild by animals other than primates, suggesting that ravens (Corvus corax) may be far more intelligent than previously believed. Simone Pika from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and Thomas Bugnyar from the...

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2011-06-13 06:20:00

The kea, a New Zealand parrot, and the New Caledonian crow are members of the two most intelligent avian families. Researchers from the Department of Cognitive Biology of the University of Vienna investigated their problem solving abilities as well as their innovative capacities. They are publishing two new studies "“ one in cooperation with members of the Behavioral Ecology Research Group in Oxford "“ in the scientific journals PLoS ONE and Biology Letters. Parrots and Corvids...


Latest Corvidae Reference Libraries

38_56be07171508211e191a87f238fc23f9
2007-10-26 12:30:07

The Pinyon Jay (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus), occurs in western North America from central Oregon to northern Baja California and east as far as western Oklahoma though it wanders further afield out of the breeding season. It lives in foothills where the pinyon pines (Pinus edulis and Pinus monophylla) occur. It was first collected and described along the Maria River in northern Montana in 1833. The Pinyon Jay is between the North American Blue Jay and the Eurasian Jay in size. Its overall...

38_f43a5cf85277430d316ebd52c27048de
2007-10-26 12:27:30

The Rufous Treepie (Dendrocitta vagabunda), is an Asian member of the crow family Corvidae. The range of this species is quite large, covering all of India up to the Himalayas, and southeasterly in a broad band into Burma (Myanmar), Laos, and Thailand in open forest consisting of scrub, plantations and gardens. It builds a nest in trees and bushes that is usually rather shallow. It is slightly smaller than the European Magpie and has somewhat shorter, more rounded wings and a...

38_324026f554d7da9c12b7b799d392fb0c
2007-10-26 12:19:34

The Red-billed Chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax), or just Chough (pronounced chuff), is a member of the crow family Corvidae. It breeds in Great Britain, the Isle of Man, Ireland, southern Europe and the Mediterranean basin, the Alps, and in mountainous country across central Asia, India and China. There is an isolated population in the Ethiopian Highlands. It breeds mainly in high mountains and on coastal sea cliffs, but sometimes in inland quarries, for example in Spain. It is resident...

38_e9a40c046f025c2900b0b21162511329
2006-02-24 12:25:52

PHOTO CAPTION: American Crow True crows are in the genus Corvus. They are large passerine birds. All temperate continents (except South America) and several offshore and oceanic islands (including Hawaii) have representatives of the 40 or so members of this genus. Crows in the genus (Corvus) appear to have evolved in central Asia and spread out into North America (including Mexico), Africa, Europe, and Australia. The latest evidence, however, appears to point towards an Australasian...

38_61ba484c273b824dea44ddd02a6e9dd1
2006-02-24 11:28:24

The Red-billed Blue Magpie (Urocissa erythrorhyncha) is a species of bird in the crow family, Corvidae. It is about the same size as the European Magpie but has a much longer tail. The head, neck and breast are black with bluish spotting on the crown. The shoulders and rump are a duller blue and the underparts are a grayish cream. The long tail is a brighter blue (as are the wing primaries) with a broad white tip. The bill is a bright orange-red as are the legs and feet and a ring around...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'