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Latest Corynebacterineae Stories

2010-09-17 14:07:02

Computer model finds probable genetic mechanism for TB dormancy An examination of a portion of the tuberculosis genome that responds to stress has allowed Rice University bioengineers Oleg Igoshin and Abhinav Tiwari to zero in on a network of genes that may "switch" the disease into dormancy. The bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can transition into a dormant state to ward off attacks from antibiotics and the immune system. A new report from Igoshin and Tiwari...

2010-07-21 13:23:27

Two tips for preventing Johne's disease on dairy farms: Use stainless steel water troughs and add chlorine to the water. That's according to Kim Cook, an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) microbiologist at the agency's Animal Waste Management Research Unit in Bowling Green, Ky. Cook did the research with Carl Bolster, a hydrologist at Bowling Green, and other colleagues. Stainless steel troughs are expensive, but not as expensive as Johne's disease. Caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium...

2010-07-01 13:58:49

A group of 85 international experts, amongst whom are two scientists from NEIKER-Tecnalia, believe that the illness known as bovine paratuberculosis or Johne's disease can be eradicated by means of control programs, new vaccines or the sacrifice of infected animals. This was the main conclusion from the meeting between scientists last February in the Scottish town of Inverness, within the framework of the European Commission (ParaTBTools) project on the mentioned illness. Paratuberculosis or...

2010-06-18 15:00:32

Buruli ulcers, one of the 'neglected tropical diseases' left aside by big pharma and governments alike, are reasonably well treatable, also in poor regions. But then more attention has to be paid to early diagnosis and correct treatment. This means the rules of the World Health Organization urgently need to be changed. So say scientists of the Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), based on ten years of research in Congo. The disease is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, a nephew of the...

2010-06-01 19:12:10

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that CCL5 protects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by attracting protective immune cells, which help control bacterial growth Ohio scientists hope to counter the re-emerging threat of tuberculosis (TB) with help from proteins from our bodies. In a research report published in the June 2010 print issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology (http://www.jleukbio.org), scientists show how the protein CCL5 plays a protective role...

2010-05-10 12:49:41

Study led by Weill Cornell Medical College and published in the journal PNAS Tuberculosis (TB) has been present in humans since ancient times. The origins of the disease date back to the first domestication of cattle, and skeletal remains show prehistoric humans (4,000 B.C.) had TB. Although relatively rare in the United States, it is the single leading bacterial cause of death worldwide. Approximately 8 million people are infected each year and 2 million people die from TB. The cause of...

2010-04-01 08:52:16

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses extraordinary survival ability by masking itself from the host immune system and persisting for decades inside the host. Speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's spring meeting in Edinburgh on March 31, Dr Kristine Arnvig provided further insight into how the bacterium causes tuberculosis (TB) by fine-tuning its behavior in response to its surroundings to escape detection. Understanding the genetic tools and tricks used by Mtb to control...

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2010-03-29 07:05:26

The factors instrumental in triggering latent tuberculosis (TB) infection to progress into active disease have long remained elusive to researchers. New insight into the mystery is provided by Professor David Russell, speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's spring meeting in Edinburgh on Sunday. His work could help develop innovative strategies for treating the disease. Professor Russell and his group at Cornell University in New York, USA, have demonstrated that TB-causing...

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2010-03-22 06:35:00

Findings could help tame extremely drug-resistant strains Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found two novel ways of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), a disease responsible for an estimated two million deaths each year. The findings, published in the March 21 online issue of Nature Chemical Biology, could lead to a potent TB therapy that would also prevent resistant TB strains from developing. "This approach is totally different from...

2010-02-11 08:20:03

Badger culling is unlikely to be a cost-effective way of helping control cattle TB in Britain, according to research published today in PLoS ONE. The authors of the study, from Imperial College London and the Zoological Society of London, say their findings suggest that the benefits of repeated widespread badger culling, in terms of reducing the incidence of cattle TB, disappear within four years after the culling has ended. Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a disease in cattle that has a serious...


Latest Corynebacterineae Reference Libraries

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2011-04-25 16:19:14

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a pathogenic bacterial species in the genus Mycobacterium and the causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. Robert Koch first discovered it in 1882 and that it had an unusual, waxy coating on the cell surface which makes them impossible to Gram stain. M. tuberculosis is highly aerobic and requires high levels of oxygen. It generally infects the respiratory system of mammals. Tuberculin skin test, acid-fast stain, and chest radiographs are the most...

0_b33ceb9bb58e871b533817f5a6385ba1
2011-04-25 15:56:48

Mycobacterium smegmatis is 3.0 to 5.0 µm long with a bacillus shape, an acid-fast bacterial species in the phylum Actinobacteria. It can be stained by Ziehl-Neelsen method and the auramine-rhodamine fluorescent method. It was first reported in 1884. Alvarez and Tavel found organisms similar to Lustgarten, who first discovered Mycobacterium. This organism was later named M. smegmatis. It is considered a non-pathogenic microorganism although, in rare cases, it can cause disease. M....

0_da8e53266fdcbd2830a775ec887963be
2011-04-25 15:36:41

Mycobacterium leprae, mostly found in warm tropical countries, is a bacterium that causes leprosy (Hansen's disease). It is an intracellular, pleomorphic, acid-fast bacterium. M. leprae is an aerobic rod-shaped surrounded by the characteristic waxy coating unique to mycobacteria tuberculosis. Due to its thick waxy coating, M. leprae stains with a carbol fuscin rather than with the traditional Gram stain. Gerhard Armauer Hansen first discovered it in 1873. It was the first bacterium to be...

45_255d6ba67dfe6f32b9c7c31f338bf912
2011-04-18 22:11:24

Mycobacterium bovis is a slow-growing, aerobic bacterium and the causative agent of tuberculosis in cattle. Similar to M. tuberculosis, M. bovis can jump the species barrier and cause tuberculosis in humans. It is estimated that M. bovis was responsible for more losses among farm animals than all other diseases combined in the first half of the 20th century. Infection happens after bacterium is ingested. It is generally transmitted to humans via infected milk. Actual human infections are...

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2011-04-15 14:19:47

Corynebacterium diphtheriae is a pathogenic bacterium that causes diphtheria. It was discovered in 1884. There are four subspecies C. diphtheriae mitis, C. diphtheriae intermedius, C. diphtheriae gravis, and C. diphtheriae belfanti. They all are a little bit different in their colonial morphology and biochemical properties such as the ability to metabolize certain nutrients. The diphtheria toxin gene is encoded by a bacteriophage which is found in toxigenic strain. A gram stain is...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.