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Latest Cosmic microwave background radiation Stories

92dd77ff79a2def12e54fa350f33090b1
2007-05-24 09:50:00

When Dutch astronomer Willem de Sitter proposed a static model of the universe in the early 1900s, he was some 3 trillion years ahead of his time. Now, physicists Lawrence Krauss from Case Western Reserve University and Robert J. Scherrer from Vanderbilt University predict that trillions of years into the future, the information that currently allows us to understand how the universe expands will have disappeared over the visible horizon. What remains will be "an island universe" made from...

2007-04-02 15:35:21

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Using relic radiation from the birth of the universe, astrophysicists at the University of Illinois have proposed a new way of measuring the fine-structure constant in the past, and comparing it with today. By focusing on the absorption of the cosmic microwave background by atoms of neutral hydrogen, the researchers say, they could measure the fine-structure constant during the "dark ages," the time after the Big Bang before the first stars formed, when the universe...

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2007-02-26 15:50:00

Instrument to help astrophysicists learn what universe is made of, how it evolves Scientists aimed the South Pole Telescope at Jupiter on the evening of Feb. 16 and successfully collected the instrument's first test observations. Soon, far more distant quarry will fall under the SPT's sights as a team from nine institutions tackles one of the biggest mysteries of modern cosmological research. That mystery: What is dark energy, the force that dominates the universe? "The telescope, camera and...

ba87b7bad529d662ad1e617fd0b08689
2007-02-02 15:30:00

MADISON - Peering backward in time to an instant after the big bang, physicists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have devised an approach that may help unlock the hidden shapes of alternate dimensions of the universe. A new study demonstrates that the shapes of extra dimensions can be "seen" by deciphering their influence on cosmic energy released by the violent birth of the universe 13 billion years ago. The method, published today (Feb. 2) in Physical Review Letters, provides...

4f9d61d0961c6b54b67f625e5af170121
2006-08-08 16:38:26

A critically important number that specifies the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances, thus allowing astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. "The reason this result is so significant is that we need the Hubble constant to tell us the size of the Universe,...

2006-03-16 15:45:00

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON -- A NASA space probe has peered back in time to a bare instant -- less than a trillionth of a trillionth of a second -- after the Big Bang, astronomers reported on Thursday. The robotic probe looked at the afterglow from the Big Bang, the energetic event scientists believe gave birth to the universe some 13.7 billion years ago, and managed to discern unprecedented detail about the earliest moments of the cosmos. "We report today the most precise measurements...

2e67fb2d8dc2171c3e23c8df0c6fcd3d1
2006-03-16 12:45:00

NASA -- You don't get much closer to the big bang than this. Scientists peering back to the oldest light in the universe have evidence to support the concept of inflation, which poses that the universe expanded many trillion times its size faster than a snap of the fingers at the outset of the big bang. We're talking about when the universe was less than a trillionth of a trillionth of a second old. In that crucial split second, changes occurred that allowed for the creation of stars and...

db1674d1cc6e5162c753f9ebb8f94ae71
2006-01-13 07:35:00

A tiny galaxy has given astronomers a glimpse of a time when the first bright objects in the universe formed, ending the dark ages that followed the birth of the universe. Astronomers from Sweden, Spain and the Johns Hopkins University used NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite to make the first direct measurement of ionizing radiation leaking from a dwarf galaxy undergoing a burst of star formation. The result, which has ramifications for understanding how the...

02187902feb7cdae4181786c7f704740
2005-11-02 17:35:00

MILWAUKEE, Wisconsin (AP) -- Researchers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland believe they have captured traces of radiation from long-extinguished stars that were "born" during the universe's infancy. The research represents the first tangible -- but not conclusive evidence of these earliest stars, which are thought to have produced the raw materials from which future stars, including our sun, were created. The Big Bang, the explosion believed to have created the universe, is...

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2005-09-08 10:40:00

Alabama -- A new analysis of 'cool' spots in the cosmic microwave background may cast new doubts on a key piece of evidence supporting the big bang theory of how the universe was formed. Two scientists at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) looked for, but couldn't find, evidence of gravitational "lensing" where you might expect to find it, in the most distant light source in the universe -- the cosmic microwave background. Results of this research by Dr. Richard Lieu, a UAH...


Latest Cosmic microwave background radiation Reference Libraries

45_dc49ada41b4f3e03865f90ed40b5e189
2013-03-16 00:00:00

Yakov Borisovich Zel'dovich (March 8, 1914 "“ December 2, 1987) was a productive Soviet physicist. He was instrumental in the advancement of Soviet nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, and also was an invaluable assistance in the fields of adsorption and catalysis, shock waves, nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics, physical cosmology, and general relativity. In 1914, he was born into a Jewish family in Minsk, now called Belarus. Four months after his birth, he and his family...

8_67ff07d77c86523b0eab2955b9ab43e02
2004-10-19 04:45:44

Cosmology -- area of science that aims at a comprehensive theory of the structure and evolution of the entire physical universe. Modern Cosmological Theories Present models of the universe hold two fundamental premises: the cosmological principle and the dominant role of gravitation. Derived by Hubble, the cosmological principle holds that if a large enough sample of galaxies is considered, the universe looks the same from all positions and in all directions in space. The second point...

6_b8c17099b12221682a99aa9cd0dd45692
2004-10-19 04:45:41

Cosmic Background Radiation -- The Big Bang theory predicts that the early universe was a very hot place and that as it expands, the gas within it cools. Thus the universe should be filled with radiation that is literally the remnant heat left over from the Big Bang, called the cosmic microwave background radiation, or CMB. When any patch of the sky is observed where no individual sources can be discerned, and the effects of the interplanetary dust, and interstellar matter are taken into...

2_7b2d00975ae3d143d38faa72be2951362
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) -- The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) was launched on June 30, 2001 at 3:46 p.m. EDT at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA. The goal of WMAP was to map out minute differences in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation which would help test theories of the nature of the universe. On February 11, 2003, the public relations group from NASA made a press release regarding the age and composition of the universe....

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snash
  • To talk saucily.
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This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.