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Latest Cost-effectiveness analysis Stories

2012-03-13 10:34:18

The American Diabetes Association recommends hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) testing as one basis for identifying diabetes and prediabetes. Setting a specific HbA1c cutoff threshold for prediabetes, which could be used to determine eligibility for interventions to prevent progression to more serious type 2 diabetes, has generated much debate, with at least three different cutoffs recommended by different professional organizations. A new study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

2011-07-22 06:47:19

(Ivanhoe Newswire)--Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. The disorder is more common in women than men and is most commonly diagnosed between ages 20 and 40, but can occur at any age. MS is caused by nerve damage as a result of inflammation. Inflammation occurs with the body's immune cells attack the nervous system. MS is the most common neurological disability found in young adults. This disease causes muscle weakness, numbness or tingling...

2011-07-13 13:08:58

In an era of skyrocketing health-care costs and finite financial resources, health economists are increasingly called upon to determine which medical treatments are the most cost-effective. To do so, they compare the price of an intervention with the improvement it is expected to deliver. For example, a highly advanced cold medicine that costs $5,000 to deliver just one additional symptom-free day to the average patient would appear to be a less-wise investment than a new chemotherapy that...

2011-07-13 13:06:35

In this week's PLoS Medicine, John Ioannidis and Alan Garber from Stanford University, USA, discuss how to use incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) and related metrics so they can be useful for decision-making at the individual level, whether used by clinicians or individual patients. The authors say that "Cost-effectiveness analysis offers a foundation for rational decision-making and can be very helpful in making health care more efficient and effective at the population level. Such...

2011-06-07 15:22:43

Doctors are more apt to recommend a more costly therapy to patients if it were determined to prolong the patient's life rather than just improve quality, according to a recent study from Medical Decision Making (published by SAGE). Using a survey of the decision-making process, authors were able obtain data to determine the relative importance oncologists place on quantity of life compared to quality of life in chemotherapy decisions. From this, they found a significant majority of...

2011-04-20 13:19:54

Analysis: The true cost of pharmacological disease prevention Experts today challenge the view that popular drugs to prevent disease - like statins and antihypertensives to prevent heart disease and stroke, or bisphosphonates to prevent fractures "“ represent value for money. In a paper published on bmj.com today, Teppo Järvinen and colleagues argue that the benefits seen when these drugs are tested in clinical trials may not apply in the real world. They argue that value for money...

2011-01-05 06:24:00

OXFORD, England, January 5, 2011 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Elsevier, the world's leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information, announced today that it has become the new publisher of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research's (ISPOR) journal Value in Health. Value in Health ( http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.authors/724501/descriptio n#description) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal reporting on outcomes...

2010-12-15 14:23:45

Neonatal intensive care provides substantial population health benefits in Mexico relative to its costs, even for very premature babies, and as such offers exceptional value for money within the country's Popular Health Insurance (Seguro Popular) program, which offers free access to a specific set of health care interventions. Furthermore, neonatal intensive care could also be cost effective in other middle-income countries. These are the findings of a study by Jochen Profit from Baylor...

2010-05-12 05:00:00

BOSTON, May 12 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Experts from PAREXEL International Corporation (Nasdaq: PRXL), a leading global biopharmaceutical services provider, will address key trends in late phase development, comparative effectiveness research, cost effective study management, and health outcomes at the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) 15th Annual International Meeting. During the meeting, to be held May 15 - 19, 2010 in Atlanta, PAREXEL...

2010-03-08 13:30:58

New study in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology explores this controversy Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is one of many serious disorders for which prenatal testing is available. SMA affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live births and is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality and the second most common autosomal recessive disorder, after cystic fibrosis. Although the American College of Medical Genetics recommends carrier testing for all couples, the American College of...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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