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Latest Cowpea Stories

2010-09-27 15:23:50

At the World Cowpea Research Conference, crop experts embrace one of agriculture's oldest legumes -- prized for protein and resilience to hot, dry climates -- as food for people, livestock and astronauts A long neglected crop with the potential to halt hunger for millions in Africa, sustain the livestock revolution underway in developing countries, rejuvenate nutrient-sapped soils, and even feed astronauts on extended space missions, is attracting scientists from around the world to Senegal...

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2010-08-05 09:32:44

AgriLife scientist: 'Time to take the monoculture blinders off' Whether we can grow bio-energy crops such as switchgrass and forage sorghum isn't the question, said a Texas AgriLife Research scientist. The question is, where's the nitrogen going to come from to grow these crops and how much is it going to add to the cost of the end product, said Dr. Gerald Smith, AgriLife Research legume breeder based in Overton. And there also are hidden costs, such as the effect of fencerow-to-fencerow...

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2010-05-20 11:08:50

Scientists in Brazil are reporting for the first time that coffee beans contain proteins that can kill insects and might be developed into new insecticides for protecting food crops against destructive pests. Their study, which suggests a new use for one of the most important tropical crops in the world, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication. Peas, beans and some other plant seeds contain proteins, called globulins, which ward off insects. Coffee...

2010-04-21 08:25:55

Foxtail millet, cowpea examined in conservation tillage experiments Conservation tillage encompasses a range of techniques for establishing crops in the previous crop's residues, which are purposely left on the soil surface. The principal benefits of conservation tillage are improved water conservation and the reduction of soil erosion; additional benefits can include reduced fuel consumption, planting and harvesting flexibility, and reduced labor requirements. A new study published in...

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2010-03-31 13:33:49

Scientists in Brazil are reporting for the first time that coffee beans contain proteins that can kill insects and might be developed into new insecticides for protecting food crops against destructive pests. Their study, which suggests a new use for one of the most important tropical crops in the world, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication. Peas, beans and some other plant seeds contain proteins, called globulins, which ward off insects. Coffee...

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2009-10-14 09:18:15

Map also facilitates genetic improvement of several other legumes Cowpea, a protein-rich legume crop, is immensely important in many parts of the world, particularly drought-prone regions of Africa and Asia, where it plays a central role in the diet and economy of hundreds of millions of people. Cowpea provides food that complements starchy staple crops such as corn, cassava, sorghum and millets to offer a well-rounded diet, much as beans and other grain legumes complement maize- and...

2009-07-29 14:57:28

The cowpea or black-eyed pea, as it is more commonly known, is a New Year's tradition for good luck. But disease and particularly aphids, which can wreck a crop within a few a days, are especially bad luck for the cowpea, according to scientists. Several new lines of cowpeas with genes that are aphid-resistant and less susceptible to disease are currently being tested by researchers with Texas AgriLife and other Texas A&M System entities."The cowpea has been an important and popular food...

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2008-02-19 10:15:00

In order to help about 200 million people in west and central Africa, a research team is hoping to increase the drought- and disease-resistance of the black-eyed pea, also known as the cowpea. The scientists at University of Virginia are working alongside African growers, who produce about 80 percent of the 3 million tons of black-eyed peas produced worldwide each year. They hope their work will result in a tougher form of the legume, which is highly susceptible to drought, insects and...

2008-02-07 09:25:31

If much of civilization is ever wiped out, at least our seeds will survive. The first specimens — 7,000 seeds from 36 African nations — have shipped to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, a repository in the Arctic Circle being built to store a safety copy of vital agricultural information, in case disaster should befall us. The vault is set to open Feb. 26. It is being built by the Norwegian government (Svalbard is part of the Kingdom of Norway), and when it opens its...


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bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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