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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 13:20 EDT

Latest Crab Stories

Horseshoe Crab Behavior Impacted By Biomedical Bleeding
2014-02-26 06:56:44

University of New Hampshire DURHAM, N.H. – New research from Plymouth State University and the University of New Hampshire indicates that collecting and bleeding horseshoe crabs for biomedical purposes causes short-term changes in their behavior and physiology that could exacerbate the crabs’ population decline in parts of the east coast. Each year, the U.S. biomedical industry harvests the blue blood from almost half a million living horseshoe crabs for use in pharmaceuticals —...

2014-02-10 23:01:21

PTPower.com’s new blog post entitled “How to Handle Crabs” teaches personal trainers how to deal with unsupportive friends and family when starting a fitness business. Chino Hills, CA (PRWEB) February 10, 2014 The new blog post entitled “How to Handle Crabs” on the fitness marketing site PTPower.com provides personal trainers with insight on how to deal with negative friends and family members who don’t support their decision in starting a fitness business. Written by Bedros...

Hormone Found In Crab Eyes Help Females Mate And Care For Their Young
2014-02-04 07:51:01

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming...

Coral Decline Affects Crustacean Biodiversity
2013-09-23 15:48:53

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online With many scientists expecting climate change to have a devastating effect on the world’s coral reefs over the coming century, new research from the University of Florida indicates that crustacean populations living near rapidly declining reef habitats could be at risk. Appearing in the November issue of the journal Geology, the new study is based on an analysis of the fossil record surrounding decapod crustaceans, a group that...

Fiddler Crab Claws: Good For Bling But Bad For Bang
2013-07-17 07:24:03

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from Gonzaga University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute reveals male fiddler crabs walk an evolutionary fine line between bling and bang. The study, published in Evolutionary Biology, finds that long light claws are better for attracting females (bling), but not for fighting (bang). Fiddler crabs are sexually dimorphic, with the males having one large and one small front claw while the females have two...

Noise Of Passing Ships Disrupts Feeding For The Common Shore Crab
2013-07-11 12:23:52

University of Exeter A study published in the journal Animal Behaviour found that the noise of passing ships disrupts feeding for the common shore crab. Perhaps worse, the team from the Universities of Exeter and Bristol also found that when threatened, crabs took longer to retreat to shelter and lost their natural 'play dead' behavior. In coastal seas around the world noise caused by humans is a dominant feature, with construction and transportation fundamentally modifying ocean...

Antarctic King Crabs May Actually Be Native
2013-07-05 05:58:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Citing the recent discovery of a major colony of King crabs near Antarctica, some global warming alarmists theorize that rising temperatures have allowed the crabs to claim territory that was previously uninhabitable. According to a new review of crab records published in the journal PLOS ONE, the crabs are not newly established settlers; they've been there all along. The so-called "invasion hypothesis is based on a geographically...

New Research Reveals Origin Of Hoff Yeti Crab
2013-06-19 11:26:51

[WATCH VIDEO: Uncovering History of Yeti Crabs] Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online For all we know about the natural world, scientists are still finding new creatures and species living in the farthest corners of earth. Just last year, for instance, oceanographers from the University of Oxford and University of Southampton discovered a species of yeti crab covering hydrothermal vents more than a mile below the Southern Ocean. These crabs, later nicknamed...

Marsh Crabs Show Ecological Benefits Of Invasive Species
2013-04-04 10:17:30

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The marsh systems around Cape Cod have been eroding at a rapid rate in the past few decades. As redOrbit reported in January, researchers from Brown University were able to find a cause and effect relationship between human interaction with the ecosystem and the rapid increase in the native purple crab population. As their research detailed, human manipulation of the region via recreational overfishing and the creation of drainage...

Ship Noise Makes Crabs Cranky
2013-02-27 15:07:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Private industry rarely has a stake in conservation, but a new study shows that reducing aquatic noise pollution could provide a financial boost for the fishing industry. A new study published in the journal Biology Letters found that the sounds of ship noise ramp up crab metabolism, potentially resulting in lower yields for commercial crabbers. Citing growing evidence that shows even a single noise exposure can affect a variety...


Latest Crab Reference Libraries

Crab-eating Raccoon, Procyon cancrivorus
2012-07-20 08:42:55

The crab-eating raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) is native to South and Central America. Its range includes Trinidad and Tobago, Costa Rica, and extends to the northern areas of Uruguay and Argentina. It prefers a habitat with abundant water resources. Although the name implies that this raccoon’s diet consists of only crabs, it also consumes other crustaceans, like lobster, as well as fruits, amphibians, and turtle eggs. The crab-eating raccoon is similar in appearance to the common...

0_7e27299519b98ce0a6093f607b9a671a
2008-05-04 22:56:03

The Vernal Crab (Liocarcinus vernalis), is a small shallow-water crab found in the northeast Atlantic. It is commonly used as bait for Black Fish. Photo Copyright and Credit

0_98516bc544fbf707ca3240fe23b765a5
2008-05-04 22:54:32

The Great Spider Crab (Hyas araneus), is a species of crab found in Atlantic waters and the North Sea, usually below the tidal zone. It was reported around the Antarctic Peninsula in 2003. This was most likely due to transportation by human agency. Photo Copyright and Credit

0_9179f068509145210afb611f9086e270
2008-05-04 22:30:19

The Halloween Crab (Gecarcinus quadratus or Gercarcinus ruricola), also known as the moon crab, should not be confused with the Halloween hermit crab. They dig burrows in rainforest habitat and are native to Central America. It lives in the forest at least some of its adult life. They have lungs that need to be moist all the time. If not, they could dry out and die. The Halloween crab is very territorial and will fight back if threatened. Photo Copyright and Credit

0_2040985df908774a8a90ecb32a80ad78
2008-05-02 01:30:13

The Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis), also known as the Big Binding Crab and Shanghai Hairy Crab, is a medium-sized burrowing crab and native in the coastal estuaries of eastern Asia from Korea in the north to the Fujian province of China in the south. This crab migrates to the coastal waters of Europe and North-America. This species' distinguishing features are the dense patches of dark hair on its claws. The crab's body is the size of a human palm. The carapace width is 1.25 to...

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