Quantcast
Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Craig Packer Stories

Lions Face Extinction, Half Likely Gone Within 40 Years
2013-03-06 11:42:06

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most people want to see wild animals run free and unrestricted in their natural habitat. However, that scenario may come to pass for African lions, which could benefit greatly from living securely within the confines of a protective fence. According to a new study in Ecology Letters, about half of Africa's wild lion population could decline to near extinction levels over the next 20 to 40 years without critical conservation...

7e229042ae6239bcae63ff7c8c56b421
2011-07-21 11:00:00

If you find yourself alone on the African plains, you may want to be more wary of wild animals, especially just after a full moon. Researchers found lion maulings increased dramatically at this time of the lunar phase when the sky is darkening and the animals are most hungry, The Guardian is reporting. Other predators, such as wolves, may also be at their most dangerous when the moon starts to wane. The discovery, from an African study of 500 lion attacks in Tanzania between 1988 and 2009,...

6f8cd35edaa966ec486895764d0f44a41
2009-06-29 10:55:00

Lions in Africa and Asia form prides in similar fashion to street gangs in order to protect their territory from other encroaching cats, according to new research. Researchers told BBC News that larger gangs have higher survival rates, which could help future conservation efforts. Researchers have observed lions forming prides, which consist of one or more males and several females and cubs. However, experts have previously been unable to explain why prides were formed. They assumed lions...

e6f10a45ce15452dc8b85760b1cc8dad1
2008-06-25 09:55:15

Climatic conditions can alter normal host-pathogen relationships An international research team, including University of Minnesota researcher Craig Packer, has found the first clear example of how climate extremes, such as the increased frequency of droughts and floods expected with global warming, can create conditions in which diseases that are tolerated individually may converge and cause mass die-offs of livestock or wildlife. The study, published June 25 by PloS (Public Library of...

2006-01-10 05:50:00

By Ed Stoddard JOHANNESBURG -- Attacks on humans by man-eating lions are on the rise in Tanzania and Mozambique, raising the stakes in the conservation game as environmentalists strive to save the big cats from extinction. Lions in the area have developed a taste for human flesh because people have been sleeping outdoors to protect their crops from raiding bushpigs, which the cats follow onto croplands, a leading expert said. "In Tanzania in the early 1990s there were about 40 recorded lion...

2005-08-17 13:55:30

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL - Since 1990 lions have killed more than 563 Tanzanians, including nursing mothers, children playing outside their huts and people dragged from their beds. Consequently, increasing numbers of lions are being killed by local people. In an effort to find a way to protect both people and lions, University of Minnesota researchers have analyzed the factors involved in attacks and identified the control of bush pigs -- a major agricultural pest -- as the most promising...