Quantcast

Latest Craniotomy Stories

2013-11-05 23:01:46

The Comprehensive Epilepsy Care Center at North Shore-LIJ’s Cushing Neuroscience Institute is one of the first in the United States and the first in the New York metro area to use a new combination of minimally invasive surgical techniques to treat epilepsy. Manhasset, NY (PRWEB) November 05, 2013 The Comprehensive Epilepsy Care Center at North Shore-LIJ’s Cushing Neuroscience Institute is one of the first in the United States and the first in the New York metro area to use a new...

2013-02-20 23:03:18

Awake craniotomy — a procedure in which the patient remains awake during brain tumor surgery in order to determine if the operation will touch on any areas that affect such abilities as speech, movement and vision — can now be done on many patients whose tumors were previously thought inoperable, or for whom surgery would have been very risky, due to the tumors´ location. This good news is due to new neuronavigation, neurosurgical, microneurosurgical and functional brain...

2012-02-03 19:00:55

CT-guided catheters carry clot-busting drug to shrink clots, Johns Hopkins-led study shows Johns Hopkins neurologists report success with a new means of getting rid of potentially lethal blood clots in the brain safely without cutting through easily damaged brain tissue or removing large pieces of skull. The minimally invasive treatment, they report, increased the number of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) who could function independently by 10 to 15 percent six months...

2011-07-18 10:31:00

New procedure significantly reduces risk of patient complications and recovery time HOUSTON, July 18, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Texas Children's Hospital is the first hospital in the world to use real-time MRI-guided thermal imaging and laser technology to destroy lesions in the brain that cause epilepsy and uncontrollable seizures. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110718/DC36561-a) (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110718/DC36561-b) (Photo:...

2011-04-07 13:15:36

The act of mind reading is something usually reserved for science-fiction movies but researchers in America have used a technique, usually associated with identifying epilepsy, for the first time to show that a computer can listen to our thoughts. In a new study, scientists from Washington University demonstrated that humans can control a cursor on a computer screen using words spoken out loud and in their head, holding huge applications for patients who may have lost their speech through...

2011-03-30 15:51:40

The first two stereo-EEG explorations in Finland were carried out by neurosurgeons of the Epilepsy surgery team in Helsinki University Central Hospital this spring. The method reinforces other examination methods already in use and opens an excellent opportunity in the exploration of the electric activity of both the surface and the deep brain structures during epileptic seizures. The examination also enables exact localization of the functionally important areas of the brain and improves...

2010-10-01 14:09:59

The procedure is performed through the eye socket, thereby eliminating removal of the top of the skull to reach the brain Surgeons at UW Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle and at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine have determined that transorbital neuroendoscopic surgery (TONES) is a safe, effective option for treating a variety of advanced brain diseases and traumatic injuries. This groundbreaking, minimally invasive surgery is performed through the...

2010-06-09 14:22:00

Surgeons at Johns Hopkins have safely and effectively operated inside the brains of a dozen patients by making a small entry incision through the natural creases of an eyelid to reach the skull and deep brain. They say access to the skull and brain through either lid, formally known as a transpalpebral orbitofrontal craniotomy, sharply contrasts with the more laborious, physically damaging and invasive, traditional means of entry used in brain surgery that requires opening the top half of the...

2007-06-19 00:00:00

By Eric Eyre, ericeyre@wvgazette.com It was a simple idea, but it took a brain surgeon to figure it out. About 10 years ago, Dr. John Schmidt and physician's assistant Larry Young were operating on a patient with a head injury at CAMC- General Hospital. They were unsure whether the patient's brain would swell, which would require them to cut out part of her skull to relieve pressure. So they improvised. They used a router saw to remove a 6-inch piece of bone flap, then attached a titanium...


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
Related