Quantcast

Latest Creativity Institute Stories

2012-10-08 13:55:02

Hate the Lakers? Do the Celtics make you want to hurl? Whether you like someone can affect how your brain processes their actions, according to new research from the Brain and Creativity Institute at USC. Most of the time, watching someone else move causes a 'mirroring' effect — that is, the parts of our brains responsible for motor skills are activated by watching someone else in action. But a study by USC researchers appearing Oct. 5 in PLOS ONE shows that whether or not you...

2011-02-17 12:16:44

But Chinese respond fastest to their direct supervisor Who do you look at in a group photo? If you're like most adults, you'll look at yourself first "” unless your boss is also in the picture. A study in PLoS ONE by researchers from the Brain and Creativity Institute at USC and Peking University examines how White Americans and Chinese people in China respond to pictures of their boss, suggesting cultural differences in our responses to authority figures. Unlike people in China, who...

2009-04-14 09:20:00

Media culture should allow time for reflective moments, say USC neuroscientists in a study that also shows higher emotions to be as rooted in the body as primal impulses Emotions linked to our moral sense awaken slowly in the mind, according to a new study from a neuroscience group led by corresponding author Antonio Damasio, director of the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California. The finding, contained in one of the first brain studies of inspirational...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.