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Latest Cretaceous Stories

2012-03-29 14:43:43

The dinosaurs of the Cretaceous may have faced an unexpected hazard: fire! In a paper published online today, researchers from Royal Holloway University of London and The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago have shown that during the Cretaceous (145-65 million years ago) fire was much more widespread than previously thought. The researchers traced fire activity in the fossil record through the occurrence of charcoal deposits, compiling a global database for this time interval....

Image 1 - New Study Supports Theory Of Extraterrestrial Impact
2012-03-06 04:37:04

A 16-member international team of researchers that includes James Kennett, professor of earth science at UC Santa Barbara, has identified a nearly 13,000-year-old layer of thin, dark sediment buried in the floor of Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico. The sediment layer contains an exotic assemblage of materials, including nanodiamonds, impact spherules, and more, which, according to the researchers, are the result of a cosmic body impacting Earth. These new data are the latest to strongly...

2012-02-28 11:52:53

The March GSA TODAY, the Geological Society of America´s open-access science and news magazine, is now online at http://www.geosociety.org/gsatoday/archive/22/3/. This month´s science article, by Todd LaMaskin of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, presents uranium-lead dating analyses of detrital zircon grains in Paleozoic-Mesozoic basin sediments in the Cordillera of western North America. LaMaskin's analysis shows a systematic variation in age distribution within...

Researchers Find New Species Of Dinosaur Age Turtle
2012-02-28 04:34:03

Researchers at the Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP), the Museu de la Conca Dellà (MCD) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have published this week in the online edition of the journal Cretaceous Research the discovery and description of a turtle from the end of the age of dinosaurs. Josep Marmi, Angel Lujan, Angel Galobart from ICP, Rodrigo Gaete from MDC, and Violeta and Oms Oriol Riera from UAB have named this new...

2011-11-18 02:49:21

A cosmic one-two punch of colossal volcanic eruptions and meteorite strikes likely caused the mass-extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous period that is famous for killing the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, according to two Princeton University reports that reject the prevailing theory that the extinction was caused by a single large meteorite. Princeton-led researchers found that a trail of dead plankton spanning half a million years provides a timeline that links the mass...

Princeton Model Shows Fallout Of Giant Meteorite Strike
2011-10-20 04:50:33

Seeking to better understand the level of death and destruction that would result from a large meteorite striking the Earth, Princeton University researchers have developed a new model that can not only more accurately simulate the seismic fallout of such an impact, but also help reveal new information about the surface and interior of planets based on past collisions. Princeton researchers created the first model to take into account Earth's elliptical shape, surface features and ocean...

Image 1 - Worms Among First Animals To Appear After Asteroid Impact
2011-10-11 12:21:28

University of Colorado researchers have found that worms were among the first animals to surface after an asteroid plowed into the Gulf of Mexico 65.5 million years ago. Geological sciences Associate Professor Karen Chin of the university said this "K-T extinction" is often focused on the survival and proliferation of mammals, and studies show some of the earliest terrestrial ecosystems to emerge were aquatic plants. However, new evidence from North Dakota shows networks of...

Image 1 - Study Finds 'Clear Evidence' Meteorite Wiped Out Primitive Birds
2011-09-20 06:10:58

  The same meteorite impact that caused dinosaurs to go extinct 65 million years ago also essentially wiped out ancient birds, a team of paleontologists claim in a new study. The researchers, led by Nicholas Longrich of Yale University, studied collections of approximately two dozen bird fossils of various species from the school's Peabody Museum of Natural History, as well as from the American Museum of Natural History, the University of California Museum of Paleontology, and the...

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2011-07-13 10:40:00

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The debate whether dinosaurs went extinct due to a large space rock that struck the Earth 65.5 million years ago (MYA) may have been answered with the discovery of a distinctive brow horn from a Ceratopsian dinosaur just 13 centimeters (5.1 inches) below the K-T boundary -- the distinct layer of geological sediments separating the Cretaceous and Tertiary periods. Rocks laid down 65.5 MYA show a thin layer abundant in rare elements...

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2011-05-10 09:43:16

Researchers have discovered that an evolutionary change from 65 million years ago may have set the pace for the rapid growth rate of present-day flowering plants. Taylor Feild, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in collaboration with a group of other researchers from around the world, have determined the precise dates that angiosperms, or flowering plants, experienced two surges in growth during the Cretaceous period. Their...


Latest Cretaceous Reference Libraries

Tenontosaurus
2013-01-29 09:53:30

Image Caption: Head of Tenontosaurus, Institut de paléontologie humaine, Paris, France. Credit: Rémih/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) Tenontosaurus, meaning “sinew lizard”, is a genus of medium to large sized ornithopod dinosaur. The genus is known from the late Aptian to Albian ages of the middle Cretaceious period sediments of western North America, dating roughly between 115 to 108 million years ago. It was formerly thought to be a ‘hypsilophodont’, but since Hypsilophodontia is no...

794px-Sauroposeidon_protheles_1
2012-03-21 22:48:02

Sauroposeidon, meaning “earthquake god lizard,” is a genus of sauropods dinosaur from the Aptian and Albian ages of the Early Cretaceous Period (110 million years ago). It was discovered in the southeast region of Atoka County, Oklahoma, not far from the border of Texas, in a claystone outcrop. The fossils were initially misidentified as pieces of petrified wood when they were found in 1994. A more detailed analysis in 1999 revealed they were truly dinosaurian bones. They were formally...

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2011-01-03 18:03:01

Qiaowanlong is a genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Albian stage of the Early Cretaceous Period (100 million years ago). It was discovered in the Yujinzi Basin of Gansu, China in 2007. It came from the geological formation called the Xinminpu Group. Qiaowanlong is known from articulated cervical (neck) vertebrae and a right pelvic girdle, as well as several unidentified bone fragments. It was the first brachiosaurid to have been found from China. Qiaowanlong is estimated to have been...

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2011-01-03 17:56:44

Qantassaurus is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur from the late Aptian to early Albian age of the Early Cretaceous Period (115 million years ago). It lived in Australia when the continent was still south of the Antarctic Circle, and was still part of the supercontinent Gondwana. Qantassaurus was discovered in 1996 during the third annual field season of the Dinosaur Dreaming Project, a dig jointly run by Monash University and Museum Victoria. It was found in the intertidal site known as Flat...

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2010-09-16 16:54:13

Santanaraptor, meaning "Santana Formation thief", is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Albian or Aptian stage of the Early Cretaceous Period (108 million years ago). It lived in what is now South America. When first discovered, Santanaraptor was thought to be a maniraptoran theropod. However, it is now thought to be a primitive coelurosaur based on features present on the femur. The type species, S. placidus, was first described by Kellner in 1999. The species name refers to Placido...

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Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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