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Latest Cretaceous Stories

Image 1 - Study Finds 'Clear Evidence' Meteorite Wiped Out Primitive Birds
2011-09-20 06:10:58

  The same meteorite impact that caused dinosaurs to go extinct 65 million years ago also essentially wiped out ancient birds, a team of paleontologists claim in a new study. The researchers, led by Nicholas Longrich of Yale University, studied collections of approximately two dozen bird fossils of various species from the school's Peabody Museum of Natural History, as well as from the American Museum of Natural History, the University of California Museum of Paleontology, and the...

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2011-07-13 10:40:00

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The debate whether dinosaurs went extinct due to a large space rock that struck the Earth 65.5 million years ago (MYA) may have been answered with the discovery of a distinctive brow horn from a Ceratopsian dinosaur just 13 centimeters (5.1 inches) below the K-T boundary -- the distinct layer of geological sediments separating the Cretaceous and Tertiary periods. Rocks laid down 65.5 MYA show a thin layer abundant in rare elements...

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2011-05-10 09:43:16

Researchers have discovered that an evolutionary change from 65 million years ago may have set the pace for the rapid growth rate of present-day flowering plants. Taylor Feild, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in collaboration with a group of other researchers from around the world, have determined the precise dates that angiosperms, or flowering plants, experienced two surges in growth during the Cretaceous period. Their...

2011-05-02 19:22:00

Fossil "“ just stone? No, a research team in Lund, Sweden, has discovered primary biological matter in a fossil of an extinct varanoid lizard (a mosasaur) that inhabited marine environments during Late Cretaceous times. Using state-of-the-art technology, the scientists have been able to link proteinaceous molecules to bone matrix fibres isolated from a 70-million-year-old fossil; i.e., they have found genuine remains of an extinct animal entombed in stone. With their discovery, the...

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2011-03-29 06:19:08

Sedimentary differences on either side of border date back 120 million years Canadians have always seen themselves as separate and distinct from their American neighbors to the south, and now they have geological proof. New research published in April's edition of Geology shows that rock formations roughly along the same political boundary as the two North American countries formed as early as 120 million years ago. Dr. Andrew Leier, of the Department of Geoscience at the University of...

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2011-02-23 10:56:19

An international research team, with Spanish participation, has discovered a new species of mollusk, Polyconites hadriani, in various parts of the Iberian Peninsula. The researchers say this species, which is the oldest in its genus, adapted to the acidification of the oceans that took place while it was in existence. This process could now determine the evolution of modern marine systems. The new species Polyconites hadriani, which was discovered in 2007, has been crowned the oldest in the...

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2011-02-13 08:26:12

Tiny organisms preserved in marine sediments hold clues about Arctic climate variation during an ancient episode of greenhouse warming. Based on reconstructions of Arctic climate variability in the greenhouse world of the Late Cretaceous, Southampton scientists have concluded that man-made global warming probably would not greatly change the climatic influence associated with natural modes of inter-annual climate variability such as the  El Niño "“ Southern...

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2011-02-03 13:11:08

Researchers have discovered the 100 million-year-old ancestor of a group of large, carnivorous, cricket-like insects that still live today in southern Asia, northern Indochina and Africa. The new find, in a limestone fossil bed in northeastern Brazil, corrects the mistaken classification of another fossil of this type and reveals that the genus has undergone very little evolutionary change since the Early Cretaceous Period, a time of dinosaurs just before the breakup of the supercontinent...

2011-01-28 00:05:50

University of Alberta researchers determined that a fossilized dinosaur bone found in New Mexico confounds the long established paradigm that the age of dinosaurs ended between 65.5 and 66 million years ago. The U of A team, led by Larry Heaman from the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, determined the femur bone of a hadrosaur as being only 64.8 million years old. That means this particular plant eater was alive about 700,000 years after the mass extinction event many...

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2011-01-07 08:25:00

Using a special form of X-ray technology, French and American researchers have managed to discern the diets of the extinct, squid-like creatures known as ammonites. The experts used the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble to analyze ammonite fossils using synchrotron X-rays. They discovered that the ancient creatures, which died out more than 65 million years ago and are related to the squid and the octopus, ate plankton. According to an ESRF press release dated January...


Latest Cretaceous Reference Libraries

Tenontosaurus
2013-01-29 09:53:30

Image Caption: Head of Tenontosaurus, Institut de paléontologie humaine, Paris, France. Credit: Rémih/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) Tenontosaurus, meaning “sinew lizard”, is a genus of medium to large sized ornithopod dinosaur. The genus is known from the late Aptian to Albian ages of the middle Cretaceious period sediments of western North America, dating roughly between 115 to 108 million years ago. It was formerly thought to be a ‘hypsilophodont’, but since Hypsilophodontia is no...

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2012-03-21 22:48:02

Sauroposeidon, meaning “earthquake god lizard,” is a genus of sauropods dinosaur from the Aptian and Albian ages of the Early Cretaceous Period (110 million years ago). It was discovered in the southeast region of Atoka County, Oklahoma, not far from the border of Texas, in a claystone outcrop. The fossils were initially misidentified as pieces of petrified wood when they were found in 1994. A more detailed analysis in 1999 revealed they were truly dinosaurian bones. They were formally...

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2011-01-03 18:03:01

Qiaowanlong is a genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Albian stage of the Early Cretaceous Period (100 million years ago). It was discovered in the Yujinzi Basin of Gansu, China in 2007. It came from the geological formation called the Xinminpu Group. Qiaowanlong is known from articulated cervical (neck) vertebrae and a right pelvic girdle, as well as several unidentified bone fragments. It was the first brachiosaurid to have been found from China. Qiaowanlong is estimated to have been...

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2011-01-03 17:56:44

Qantassaurus is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur from the late Aptian to early Albian age of the Early Cretaceous Period (115 million years ago). It lived in Australia when the continent was still south of the Antarctic Circle, and was still part of the supercontinent Gondwana. Qantassaurus was discovered in 1996 during the third annual field season of the Dinosaur Dreaming Project, a dig jointly run by Monash University and Museum Victoria. It was found in the intertidal site known as Flat...

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2010-09-16 16:54:13

Santanaraptor, meaning "Santana Formation thief", is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Albian or Aptian stage of the Early Cretaceous Period (108 million years ago). It lived in what is now South America. When first discovered, Santanaraptor was thought to be a maniraptoran theropod. However, it is now thought to be a primitive coelurosaur based on features present on the femur. The type species, S. placidus, was first described by Kellner in 1999. The species name refers to Placido...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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