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Insects Found To Have Similar Hearing System To That Of Dolphins
2012-12-14 11:00:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have discovered a hearing system component previously thought to be unique to toothed whales — such as dolphins — in insects. The team, comprised of scientists from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Auckland, with colleagues from Plant & Food Research in New Zealand, and engineers from the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, is challenging ideas about how a large group...

Pygmy Mole Crickets Can Jump On Water
2012-12-03 16:41:51

Cell Press [ Watch The Video ] Pygmy mole crickets are known to be prodigious jumpers on land. Now, researchers reporting in the December 4th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have found that the tiny insects have found an ingenious method to jump from the water, too. Their secret is a series of spring-loaded, oar-like paddles on their back legs. "Pygmy mole crickets have solved the most difficult task of jumping from the surface of water," says Malcolm Burrows of...


Latest Cricket Reference Libraries

Southern Cricket Frog, Acris gryllus
2013-07-26 13:49:45

The Southern Cricket Frog (Acris gryllus) is a small Hylid frog that is native to the Southeastern United States. It's very similar in appearance and habits to the Northern Cricket Frog, Acris crepitans, and was previously conspecific. The scientific name Acris is from the Greek word for locust, and the species name gryllus is Latin for cricket. The Southern Cricket Frog is approximately 0.75 to 1.5 inches. It has a pointed snout. The hind leg is more than half of the body length when...

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2005-09-07 18:59:19

Katydid is the common name of insects belonging to the grasshopper family Tettigoniidae, which contains over 6,800 species. Katydid are also known as "long horned grasshoppers" and "bush crickets." The term "katydid" is used mainly in the U.S., Canada, and Australia. The name "katydid" comes from the sound produced by species of the N. American genus Pterophylla (literally "winged leaf"). The males of katydids have sound-producing (stridulating) organs located on their front wings which in...

40_9de0cb905b09e42423dfdf5cb4573214
2005-08-25 11:12:07

The Jerusalem cricket (Stenopelmatus) is a genus of large, flightless insects native to western United States, along the Pacific Coast, and south into Mexico. Because of its large, human-like head, it is commonly called the nino de la tierra (Spanish for "child of the earth"), or wó see ts'inii (Navajo for "skull insect"). It is also often called the potato bug, or alternatively the old bald-headed man. Despite their name, Jerusalem crickets are not true crickets. Also, Potato bugs are...

40_679a7120a90bc3449a6ecb669210fe98
2005-08-25 09:40:19

The Orthoptera are an order of insects with incomplete metamorphosis, including the grasshoppers, crickets, locusts, and katydids. Many insects in this order produce sound (known as stridulation) by rubbing their wings against each other or their legs, the wings or legs containing rows of corrugated bumps. Their ears, located in the front legs, are interconnected in such a way that they are able to locate each other by sound. Characteristics Orthopterans have two pairs of wings - the...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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