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Latest Critical Care Medicine Stories

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Common After A Stay In An Intensive Care Unit
2014-05-19 03:27:32

American Thoracic Society Patients who have survived a stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) have a greatly increased risk of developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference. "An ICU stay can be traumatic for both patients and their families," said Ann M. Parker, MD, a Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine fellow at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. "In our...

2014-04-03 11:08:53

Muscle weakness associated with physical impairments 2 years later Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), new Johns Hopkins research suggests. The scientists found that for every day of bed rest in the ICU, muscle strength was between 3 and 11 percent lower over the following months and years. "Even a single day of bed rest in the ICU has a lasting impact on weakness, which...

2013-11-26 13:39:09

Better, earlier care may mean fewer ICU admissions; implications for US as national health care reform begins A multi-institution study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that increasing the number of insured patients is not associated with higher intensive care unit (ICU) usage in Massachusetts. Because ICU care is expensive, concerns have been raised that increasing the number of insured patients would inevitably lead to...

2013-06-24 10:28:37

Findings have implications for the lives of 210,000 patients in U.S. who arrest during hospitalizations each year The brain-preserving cooling treatment known as therapeutic hypothermia is rarely being used in patients who suffer cardiac arrest while in the hospital, despite its proven potential to improve survival and neurological function, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report in the June issue of Critical Care Medicine. The authors...

2013-04-17 15:52:31

Stem cells and tissue-specific cells can be grown in abundance from mature mammalian cells simply by blocking a certain membrane protein, according to scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Their experiments, reported today in Scientific Reports, also show that the process doesn't require other kinds of cells or agents to artificially support cell growth and doesn't activate cancer genes. Scientists hope that lab-grown...

2013-04-16 12:40:46

Average annual incidence of sepsis, a leading killer, varies by as much as 3.5-fold depending on method used Though the toll of sepsis is known to be enormous — it is estimated to cost the U.S. health care system $24.3 billion each year, and is the nation's third-leading killer, behind heart disease and cancer — the true magnitude of incidence of and death from the illness remains unknown. There is substantial variability in these numbers, depending on the method used to...

2012-07-19 00:40:08

As severe sepsis becomes a silent epidemic among the elderly, greater mental health screenings may be necessary for spouses Severe sepsis, a body´s dangerous defensive response against an infection, not only diminishes the quality of life for patients — it puts their spouses at a greater risk of depression, a joint University of Michigan Health System and University of Washington School of Medicine study shows. Wives whose husbands were hospitalized for severe sepsis were...

2012-03-24 03:28:11

"Adiposity is known to be related to asthma. Although a causal link between adiponectin (a protein produced by adipose tissue) and asthma has been demonstrated in mice, Low serum adiponectin levels predict an increased future risk for developing asthma in middle-aged women, particularly among smokers, according to a new study. the evidence in humans has been conflicting," said lead author Akshay Sood, MD, MPH, associate professor in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine...

2011-11-18 07:09:24

Heart rate recovery at one minute after a six-minute walking distance (6MWD) test is highly predictive of clinical worsening and time to clinical worsening in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), according to a new study. "Ours is the first study to show that heart rate recovery at one minute of rest (HRR1) following a 6MW test is a strong predictor of clinical worsening in IPAH patients," said Omar A. Minai, MD, staff physician in the Department of Pulmonary,...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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