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Latest Crust Stories

3a1d768a4d948a13b36ac73ba4449aea1
2008-09-09 14:50:00

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have developed a new exploration method to assist the oil and gas industry in identifying more precisely where the oceans and continents meet. Geophysicists at Liverpool have produced a mathematical technique to process satellite data that can map the thickness of the Earth's crust under the oceans in order to locate where the continents meet oceanic crust. The technique has been used to measure the crustal thickness of areas such as the South...

6e925c9274aa5c1811f4be40dbb11a081
2008-08-13 13:35:00

Diamonds from Brazil have provided the answers to a question that Earth scientists have been trying to understand for many years: how is oceanic crust that has been subducted deep into the Earth recycled back into volcanic rocks? A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, working alongside colleagues at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory, have gained a deeper insight into how the Earth recycles itself in the deep earth tectonic cycle way beyond the depths that can be accessed by...

2008-08-01 03:00:26

By Steinhoefel, Grit Hegner, Ernst; Oliver, Grahame J H Abstract: Major- and trace-element data and Nd isotope compositions for granitoid samples from the Grampian Highlands in Scotland show a systematic evolution in the composition of their sources in the course of the Caledonian Orogeny. Granitoids of 511- 451 Ma, related to the collision of the Midland Valley island arc with the Grampian terrane, show S-type affinity and fractionated REE patterns with minor Eu anomalies and low initial...

caecccf001abdcda76e2b1cc819408bd1
2008-07-17 16:15:00

A lone granite boulder found against all odds high atop a glacier in Antarctica may provide additional key evidence to support a theory that parts of the southernmost continent once were connected to North America hundreds of millions of years ago. Writing in the July 11 edition of the journal Science, an international team of U.S. and Australian investigators  describe their findings, which were made in the Transantarctic Mountains, and their significance to the problem of piecing...

c369959f98d49ca7f8ddf78b7def1a921
2008-06-25 12:52:18

The dramatic differences between the northern and southern hemispheres of Mars have puzzled scientists for 30 years. One of the proposed explanations--a massive asteroid impact--now has strong support from computer simulations carried out by two groups of researchers. Planetary scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, were involved in both studies, which appear in the June 26 issue of Nature. "It's a very old idea, but nobody had done the numerical calculations to see what...

28f9b4b16f11c0396d5f753d3bf1404f
2008-06-14 08:45:48

MADISON - A new analysis of ancient minerals called zircons suggests that a harsh climate may have scoured and possibly even destroyed the surface of the Earth's earliest continents. Zircons, the oldest known materials on Earth, offer a window in time back as far as 4.4 billion years ago, when the planet was a mere 150 million years old. Because these crystals are exceptionally resistant to chemical changes, they have become the gold standard for determining the age of ancient rocks, says...

2008-06-06 03:00:33

By Oliver, Grahame J H Wilde, Simon A; Wan, Yusheng Abstract: Thirty-seven granitoids from Scotland have been dated using the sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe zircon method. Granitoids were intruded during: (1) crustal stretching at c. 600 Ma after Rodinia broke up (A-types); (2) the Grampian event of crustal thickening when the Midland Valley Arc terrane collided with Laurentia at c. 470 Ma (S-types); (3) erosion and decompression of the over-thickened Laurentian margin at c. 455...

cea1660881bc22ce2381b1913219adb2
2008-05-14 10:00:41

Scientists from Durham University will use robots to explore the depths of the Atlantic Ocean to study the growth of underwater volcanoes that build the Earth's crust.The Durham experts will lead an international team of 12 scientists aboard Britain's Royal Research Ship James Cook which will set sail from Ponta Delgada, San Miguel, in the Azores on Friday, May 23.During the five-week expedition they will use explorer robots to map individual volcanoes on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge tectonic plate...

e32614fa719d9062414220384c08426d
2008-05-13 10:35:00

A new study of possible links between climate and geophysics on Earth and similar planets finds that prolonged heating of the atmosphere can shut down plate tectonics and cause a planet's crust to become locked in place."The heat required goes far beyond anything we expect from human-induced climate change, but things like volcanic activity and changes in the sun's luminosity could lead to this level of heating," said lead author Adrian Lenardic, associate professor of Earth science at Rice...

2008-05-06 17:28:49

You know Earth's schematic: core, mantle, crust, right? Sorry, not so simple. Like the gooey center of a chocolate morsel harboring peanut butter and honey, inner Earth is far more nuanced than outward appearances would suggest. A new model is proposed in the May 2 issue of the journal Science. Earth is made up of several layers, once thought to be pretty distinct. The skin, or crust, goes down about 25 miles (40 km). Below that is the mantle area, which extends about...


Latest Crust Reference Libraries

4_33609f8ebef994f54be143abe0bef9f42
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Earth -- in geology and astronomy, fifth largest planet of the solar system and the only planet definitely known to support life. Gravitational forces have molded the earth, like all celestial bodies, into a spherical shape. However, the earth is not an exact sphere, being slightly flattened at the poles and bulging at the equator. The equatorial diameter is c.7,926 mi (12,760 km) and the polar diameter 7,900 mi (12,720 km); the circumference at the equator is c.24,830 mi (40,000 km)....

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